Up@dawn 2.0

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Zach Byrn (3-3) final free wil post

Zachary Byrn
Section 12, Group 3
Free Will (Installment #3)
Contradictions of free will seem to irritate me, especially from a philosophical view. Determinism and indeterminism are two ideas that generally argue against free will. Determinism essentially says that everything happens for a reason, there is no action that is not already predetermined. But it also contradicts itself. Determinism is not true because if anything is true, then it must be physical, which makes it indeterminism. Indeterminism is describing our every action as chance. “It was by chance that this action happened”, meaning that we lack the free will to make that action happen. This also contradicts itself: just because some events happen by “chance” does not mean that we live in a world of undetermined actions and outcomes that are random. 
I do not chose to believe that free will is true because all other arguments are too confusing to me, I understand them perfectly. Free will just makes the most sense to me without having to include unnecessary overthinking that comes with most other ideas to explain the way humans function and react to the world we live in. Either we are under free will of our own bodies, or we are not. No in between. 
This is a comical relief to the idea of free will that I found interesting, yet still slightly getting the point and idea that I am conveying in my installments.

This website was used for all my installments, but helped majorly with my last installment.


2 comments:

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  2. "Determinism is not true because if anything is true, then it must be physical, which makes it indeterminism." I don't follow this. Can you explain?

    "Indeterminism is describing our every action as chance. " Not necessarily. It can just mean that some actions are not determined.

    "Either we are under free will of our own bodies, or we are not. No in between. " I can't agree. "In between" is almost always where truths are found.

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