Up@dawn 2.0

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Section H1 Author posts

Group 1 - Our group discussed freedom.  We contemplated the idea that the most complete freedom we can have allows us free choice until something we do would limit someone else's free choice.
-Sarah Anderson

Group 2- Our group had a conversation about the question, "what is freedom?" We came up with a few different theories, but a theme was the physical nature of freedom: that is, how the laws of physics restrict our freedom. Also, we discussed the idea of freedom inside of societal structures (in which we all exist). This 'freedom' is conditional based upon what the moral standards of the society is.   - Bryce Marion

Group 3 - We defined a personal philosophy not as one's set of morals, but as one's approach to living, or as the application of the sums of their experiences. In regards to the necessity of a personal philosophy, we said that for some, it is necessary to have their philosophies to be set within their minds to achieve peace, while for others, trying to decide where they stand on philosophical issues is a source of anxiety. So, it is necessary for some and not for others to have a personal philosophy to be happy in life. -Noah Delk

42 comments:

  1. Jeanette Stevens5:55 PM CST

    I was a member of group 2, and this question really hit me. I don't think I have ever sat down and truly though about what I consider freedom to be. In my mind, I see true freedom as anarchy. I don't know if a truly free world could or will ever exist, which I don't think is necessarily a bad thing. While I definitely do not agree with many of the current laws in our country, I believe that there should be repercussions for negative actions.

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  2. When we get to Immanuel Kant in the Enlightenment, we'll see him defending freedom as submission to a self-imposed and universal rational law. In some ways that's the opposite of anarchy. But is it freedom? This conversation is clearly to be continued...

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  3. Janie Kullmar11:06 AM CST

    I was in group 3 and our discussion caused me to think about the connection between philosophy and psychology. I think many times personal philosophies contribute to happiness. They can offer a consistent model for processing both positive and negative events. If when something terrible happens to an individual they are able to fall back on truths that cause their problems to be put in a larger perspective it can minimize the intimidation of the problem. After thinking about the idea of therapeutic philosophy, I think that psychologist may need more training in philosophy. I am unwilling to suggest that we hand over the role of therapist to the philosophers. I think it could be incorporated in combination with other therapies, but if it was done on a case by case basis when the therapist sees fit I think it could be wonderful. I did read a about a therapy that sounded very similar in my class last semester.

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  4. I was in group 1. I think freedom under the law (such as in the US) should indeed be the type of freedom my group suggested... freedom to act as long as it does not affect other's freedoms or break society's moral code.

    However, I have been thinking about this idea, and I think the truest, deepest freedom is different than anarchy. Free will indeed allows you to act however you wish, but I think true mental/spiritual freedom comes when you are true to yourself and adhere to goodness. For example, you may be free to hold a grudge or forgive... but I think true freedom comes when you forgive.

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    1. That makes sense, I really like that. It isn't just about what you are allowed to do by an establishment, like the government or school.

      Forgiveness is a really good example and it is similar to other types of choosing your own freedom. People's opinions influence other people's actions. We do things we don't want to do for people we care about. We dress a certain way to be free from judgement. The more I think about it the less it makes sense to me. I don't think losing freedom is all that bad. Certainly good parents aren't free to do what they want all the time. But then again we chose our actions and what made us choose them isn't really bondage so maybe freedom is less individual and it is more granted. I don't really know.

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    2. I think that's a very interesting point about forgiveness being true freedom. I've never thought of it myself, but I agree with you. I also think that's true about good parents not being able to do what they want all the time. So I guess that raises the question of whether or not freedom is always a good thing.

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  5. Here are some of the This I Believe Essays I liked particularly well...

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/11320/

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/21253/

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/28061/

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    1. I really like the second essay. He shows a great example of the power of creativity to solve problems, like their lack of clothes. His mother seems like a woman we could all benefit from. ^.^

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    2. I almost posted the link for the third one, animals can be really therapeutic. I know my dog can help me relax when I feel overwhelmed, and I think everyone appreciates the dog they bring to the library during finals week so everyone can pet it.

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  6. I found a "This I Believe" essay that spoke to me rather quickly. The study of cultural religion is very fascinating to me, so by searching the religion category, I found this article by Mohandas Gandhi. http://thisibelieve.org/essay/16872/

    I relate to his essay very well, since he seems to have the same deistic views that I do. The essay focuses on love as the basis for human peace. He rejects the views of organized religion and focuses on individual relationships between a person and whatever God or gods it is that they believe in. I too find many faults in organized religion, but I do believe a personal relationship with a higher power can be used for the greater good.

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    1. I loved the Gandhi article as well. I especially like when he mentions that God is no dictator and explained that the contest of religious beliefs ("my God is better than your God") puts shame to the belief. It is a nice article, and I believe that it could indeed change how people look at others ideals and cultures positively, instead of being arrogant to them.

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  7. These are a few of the "This I Believe" essays that I liked.

    This one is easy for me to relate to because I have a dog that I regularly walk, sometimes just so I can escape the craziness of being in college.
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/10598/

    This essay helped remind me that I need to be content where I am and with what I have.
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/24791/

    This one is fitting since we just finished our very long winter break before we began the spring semester.
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/22043/

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    1. I love all of these! I almost posted the third one... I think having a day of rest, or even a season of rest, is necessary!

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  8. Victoria Lay8:33 PM CST

    I really enjoyed this "This I Believe" essay on nature. Sometimes it is easy to forget about the natural world that we are a part of, but that doesn't separate us from it. I appreciate the message that it important to go out and experience the world around us. I always find it soothing in particular to watch and listen to the rain as it falls in my yard.

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/144058/

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  9. As I browsed through “This I Believe” I found a post that made me think. The post “The Stories We Tell, The Stories We Are,” written by Jennie Kiffmeyer was about her father who passed away. She briefly discussed that she knew very little about him before he passed. She mentioned that she would like her children and loved ones to know more stories about her life to pass on. Kiffmeyer stated, “I hope I will not be as much of a mystery to my own children, as my father was to me.” This made me especially interested in my parents and what I know about them. I would like to be able to pass on their stories. http://thisibelieve.org/essay/140004/

    Annie Gillcrist (SECTION 12)

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  10. http://thisibelieve.org/essay/30/
    I am a "wobbly" but I don't like to admit it. This essay really comforted me! Certainly there are specific issues but I am apt to see both sides on many others. I thought for a long time that I would grow out of this and I hope to, but this essay did not affirm my prediction. I would like to say it makes me a better peacekeeper and it often does but not always. Arguments don’t at all bother me so I don’t often try to end them and I love listening to people with concrete beliefs argue. However sometimes it just makes me silent and at other times it just makes me more frustrated with people using poor arguments. I will often play devils advocate if I don't see one side being presented fairly.


    FQ: In his philosophy declaring his happiness, what does Hammerstien say is necessary to enjoy the world.

    FQ: What does the essay "There Is No God" say is easy to believe?

    FQ: What book did Azar Nafis's philosophy entitled "The Mysterious Connection that Brings Us Together" cite as an example of empathy?

    FQ: What does the essay "I agree with a Pagan" say matters more, skills or relationships.


    DQ: In Victor Hanson's philosophy he claims that human nature doesn't change. I agree with this on one level. But I wonder how much of an impact circumstances have. I specifically think that oppression of a people can change humans and their instincts, so what is human nature?

    DQ: When reading the essay about anti-semitism by Eboo Patel, I wondered if it is important for people to encourage talking about their beliefs.

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  11. Rebecca Clippard3:54 PM CST

    I am in Group 3 and agreed that personal philosophies can help one attain happiness but I also believe limiting one’s ideas can lead to a decline in happiness. Because not everyone will have the same personal philosophy.

    The purpose for This I Believe is, among other things, to share beliefs. But in order for the authors to be inspirational and influential, does that mean beliefs are in a state of flux? If I decide I agree with someone’s specific beliefs, do I truly have my own? Or do I just add on from other people’s ideas? Does that mean the authors' beliefs are not, eloquent as they are, permanent? Or is it because they are temporary that they are so valuable? With some of the links, I thought, ‘no that doesn’t make sense to me’ but why not? Do I follow confirmation bias and only allow the ‘agreeable’ speeches to continue to influence me?

    The essay There is Such a Thing as Truth, makes some good points on this matter. I also think there is such a thing as truth, but maybe not how Plato would have described it. I liked the way this author defined truth through example. http://thisibelieve.org/essay/28/

    The http://thisibelieve.org/essay/34/ was also intriguing. I found it interesting how he immediately separated himself from Atheism.

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    1. I love Penn's essay! I'm not sure how his consistently saying how he does't believe in God does't make him an atheist though. Maybe he's just saying he has no clue whether or a god exists or not. I think being an atheist doesn't necessarily require proof of a negative though. In my opinion, a belief doesn't necessarily need to be backed by evidence. Its just human inclination. Maybe he's like me and just doesn't want to be labeled (it sort of backs you into a corner).

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  12. I was in group 1, and as has been mentioned, we discussed freedom. I agree with my group that in the most basic sense, freedom is free choice until our actions limit others' free choice. However, I believe freedom runs deeper. Our most free landscape is our mind, which formulates our thoughts and beliefs. In this sense, I believe no one can inhibit our truest, deepest freedoms.

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  13. I find it exceedingly difficult to believe in anything. Firstly, there will always be a counter argument for every possible dogmatic assertion. This makes it unnerving, at least for me, to put yourself in anyone’s intellectual camp. I prefer to hypothesize but not determine (if that makes any sense). This being said, I found these three essays easy to agree with.

    • http://thisibelieve.org/essay/16755/
    “Men need a religious belief to make sense out of life. I wish I had such a belief myself, but any creed of mine would be honeycombed with confusions and reservations.” – C. Day Lewis (poet)
    • http://thisibelieve.org/essay/17053/
    “The universe is too great a mystery for there to be only one single approach to it.” (Quoting Symmachus) – Arnold Toynbee (historian)
    • http://thisibelieve.org/essay/17183/
    “I believe in uncertainty. I believe that the four words ‘I could be wrong’ should be etched above every schoolroom, house of worship, political assembly hall, and scientific laboratory” – Alan Barger (pastor)

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  15. I was in group 3 and quite frankly I have been dreading philosophy. We actually talked about it in my group which I think was awesome—personally, thinking about philosophical questions is not a source of comfort to me like it is for other classmates and friends that I interact with. They find great joy in debating back and forth or asking tricky questions, like Socrates. I am willing to advance my knowledge in areas where I could potentially hurt someone (problematic behaviors such as racism definitely need to be expounded upon) but others question such as ‘do we have free will’ or ‘what is the best moral system’ are questions that I believe are pointless for me to try and expound upon. These questions, whether I find an answer for them or not, do not improve my quality of life whatsoever. However, talking with my group was interesting because I got to hear why it was important for other members in my group who believe in these big questions. I am a naturally peaceful person, conflict makes me very stressed, but the laid-back and judgment free atmosphere of our talks allowed to me to take in information rather than worry about saying something to pacify others. I believe in a personal philosophy of how you live your life, but as far as philosophical debating and the idea that those who dislike it are “uneducated swine”, I have to disagree.

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  16. I was a member of Group 2, and we discussed what freedom is. We talked about the idea that we can never truly acquire true freedom since we are always bound by the Laws of Nature. However, I like to think of freedom as existing within the Laws of Nature, rather than the Laws existing within freedom, since freedom is an idea conceived by humankind who is initially governed by these Laws. Looking at it this way, I agreed with Jeanette that absolute freedom would be analogous to an anarchy, with every person doing whatever they wanted simply because they wanted to. However, this type of freedom is not conducive to a functioning and civilized society. I think that the ideal freedom would be allowing an individual the means to do whatever he wishes, so long as his/her actions do not inhibit another individual's actions or wishes. I also believe that this type of freedom can be broken down into two sub-categories: A physical freedom and an intellectual freedom. The physical freedom refers to, of course, our physical actions. I believe that these actions should only be limited if they interfere with another person. However, I believe that intellectual freedom should have no limitations. Whether it be knowledge or expression, people should always have the freedom to seek knowledge, question, and share their beliefs. This freedom is very difficult to keep in its absolute form, though many governments have laws to defend a citizen's right to Freedom of Speech.

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  17. I especially enjoyed the This I Believe Essay "Finding Neverland." While short, I liked what it had to say about occasionally finding your inner child and how it can help you connect with other people. It made an interesting assertion that no matter what age, a part of all of us will always be somewhat childish.
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/90831/

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    1. I loved this essay and I'm so jealous you found it before me! I am naturally childish at heart and the idea of all these macho construction workers building a treehouse for a little kid is so heartwarming. I believe that doing something so simply "good" or "pure", not expecting any sort of monetary or extravagant gain, can work wonders on a persons soul and how they interact with others.

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  18. I found a This I Believe essay that I really loved called “I Believe in the Car Radio”. The essay is about a girl who was having a terrible day, and a song came on her radio and, by the end of it, her mood had done a complete 180. For me, this essay hits close to home because I have an addiction to music, especially in the car. It passes the time, it cements memories, it inspires me. I have so many memories that spring forward with a simple piano note or strum of a guitar. I understand how a song, either on its own or by association, can change your set of thinking. Car radios are almost magical in how they can sometimes predict your mood and play the absolute perfect song, and I agree with the author in believing in such a strange piece of machinery, of entrusting your mood and entertainment to an emotionless electronic every time you turn on your car and crank the stereo. http://thisibelieve.org/essay/68748/

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  19. I found two essays that resonated with me, one by songwriter Loudon Wainwright III and the second by musician Bela Fleck. Because the two are artists, these essays focus on creativity as a source of inspiration and success.

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/22867/

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/23041/

    In the first essay, entitled "How Do You Believe In A Mystery," Loudon Wainwright III writes that although he is not particularly religious, he always finds himself thanking a divine something or Someone after being hit by inspiration. He says he believes in the power of creation, or of one's work. He is always thankful after writing a song because he has "experienced a mystery". This is interesting as I tend to think of inspiration as coming from within the self, as opposed to being handed out by a divine entity. I believe true inspiration is like our subconscious talking with no filter; it is true uninhibited expression.

    You guys should definitely check out this essay, because Bela Fleck plays an original song for his grandfather on it! Anyway, in the second essay, entitled "Doing Things My Own Way," Bela Fleck discusses his philosophy of figuring things out for yourself. He claims that combining this do-it-yourself attitude with a rigorous work ethic is the key to success. I agree with him; I think that with enough ambition anyone can become successful in their field.

    I have also gathered some questions from these readings for the class:

    FQ: What instrument does Bela Fleck play?

    DQ: Do you believe that inspiration is derived from the self, or does it stem from divinity?

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  20. H01

    I am in group 2. We discussed freedom. I believe that freedom is and should be being able to do whatever you want without harming someone else or their property. I see this as a goal for our society.

    This I believe: http://thisibelieve.org/essay/16820/

    I found it amazing that a man who fought in a war against people who were different form him and could have come out of it hating those he fought against and any people like them instead came to the conclusion that everyone is the same and should be treated well, something some people still struggle with.

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  21. I am from group 2. I thought the freedom discussion was interesting because it brought about many layers to mull over. From physical capabilities to moral decisions, it was a HUGE question, and that is just how I like my questions to be.
    Some essays I found interesting:
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/11320/
    I found this particular article to be refreshing because it focused on the ironies of life, yet also pushed for action instead of stagnant acceptance.
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/22867/
    This article stood out to me because. even though I consider myself to be a musician, I disagree wholeheartedly with almost every point it proposed. I believe it is not the "inspiration" that matters to a musician, but instead, the countless hours dedicated to the art which produce fruits. Secondly, he claims to never acknowledge a higher power, until he is "enlightened" with a new work. I am a firm believer in philosophical integrity, so this habit of believing sometimes and not others, bothers me. Lastly, the author chooses to intentionally not think about the "mystical" process of songwriting because he is afraid it will ruin the magic. I am also a firm believer in living an examined life, so for one to not examine the most crucial part of one's life makes no sense to me.

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  22. Alden Wakefield4:08 AM CST

    As I browsed "This I Believe," I found two articles which I felt I should share. The first one is centered around the topic of legacy. I feel that the memories you leave with others as you leave this world are one of the zeniths of living. The legacy that lives after death is the final testament to our lives, and this is a facet of my own life I try to better every day. The author of the essay talks about how, after his father passed away, he found a way to commemorate his life and remember the lessons he taught.

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/54645/

    The second essay I found is concerned with the subject of friendship and brotherhood. Being in a fraternity, brotherhood is important to me; this essay uses friendship as a coping mechanism and even an answer to life. He quotes Whitman, saying:

    I have perceiv’d that to be with those I like is enough,

    To stop in company with the rest at evening is enough,

    To be surrounded by beautiful, curious, breathing, laughing flesh is enough,

    To pass among them, or touch any one, or rest my arm ever so lightly round his or her neck for a moment—what is this, then?

    I do not ask any more delight—I swim in it, as in a sea.

    So let me swim, before I am plucked from the waters.

    Here is the link for his essay:
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/87058/

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  23. I found:

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/11833/

    Regarding hunger for a better a life

    and http://thisibelieve.org/essay/28428/

    Regarding coming through hardships.

    I am a member of Group 1 in 008.

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  24. #008

    FQ: What did Thomas Hobbes have built into his walking stick?

    FQ: What radio host brought This I Believe to NPR?

    DQ: Why do you think peripatetics became a thing? What is it about walking that lets thoughts run free? Does this method work for you?

    Links to This I Believe stories that I enjoyed:
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/11320/
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/21254/

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  25. #008

    FQ: What did Thomas Hobbes have built into his walking stick?

    FQ: What radio host brought This I Believe to NPR?

    DQ: Why do you think peripatetics became a thing? What is it about walking that lets thoughts run free? Does this method work for you?

    Links to This I Believe stories that I enjoyed:
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/11320/
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/21254/

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  26. Jeffrey LaPorte11:02 AM CST

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/7672/
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/92156/
    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/138/

    I was in group three and I though it was very interesting how we decided that everyone has a personal philosophy whether they choose to examine it often or not. this fits with what I have always believed which is that there are no atheists. Everyone believes, fervently, passionately, in something and everyone worships whether it is a god, a philosophy, or merely there own self. This I believe affirms this as well. They take everyone from the great minds of the age to people who are merely listeners and give them a way to express what is at the core of their being and a surprising number express hope. Being a religious studies minor I was immediately drawn to the religion section and the first essay is one I found there. It speaks of how comedy is an essential part of religion and this really spoke to me as a person who believes nothing should be above a joke, since jokes create new perspectives and foster thinking about things in way we normally would not, which is very important i examining ones spiritual belief. The third essay is about atheism, a philosophy I do not ascribe to and have alway wanted to understand, however I liked this particular essay because it introduced me to a paradox that left me even more confused. This man's reason for his atheism, namely his belief in the kindness and decency of mankind, is also the cornerstone of my own religion. The 2nd essay was some lighter fare I picked up between browsing different religious papers. The author of that one speaks on the hope found in gene Rodenberry's Star Treck and in science fiction in genera. The hope that one day humanity will wake up and realize that race, religion, and resources are no reason to kill each other and devote themselves full time to science and exploration. I don't really beleive this is likely but it was to nice a thought for me to omit.

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  27. Evan Conley11:08 AM CST

    #H1

    I was in Group 2's discussion about freedom. We played around with the idea that freedom is everything allowed by the laws of physics, and then a type of freedom limited by the morals of a society. These explanations of freedom, however, seem complicated. It is difficult, using these parameters, to determine what exactly freedom is. I think it could be simplified by the idea of an absolute freedom. An individual with absolute freedom could do literally anything that he/she desired. However, there is no individual in existence with absolute freedom. I believe that humans experience various degrees of freedom, but are limited by their surroundings. An example of something that limits absolute freedom would be gravity, which restricts an individual's freedom to stay suspended in the air indefinitely. It seems easier to me to set the bar for freedom at 100% of what a person might want to do, and then gauge the amount of freedom a person has by how much of that absolute freedom is restricted.

    One essay that was relevant to my interests and made sense to me was I Could Be Wrong by Allan Barger.

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/17183/

    Firstly, the perspective of a gay minister is not one that I've had many chances to see from. What particularly spoke to me was Barger's assertion that many of the travesties committed in the name of religion are a result of the believers of that religion being unwilling to even begin to think that they might be wrong. Furthermore, Barger speaks disdainfully of science that is swept under the rug because it doesn't fit well with the personal philosophies and ideas that are currently held and accepted. While no astounding secrets were revealed, and reading the essay did not lead me to an instantaneous revelation about something I was not already aware of, seeing that these problems are being picked at is comforting.

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  28. I was in group 2, and the question of freedom is one that I have battled with for a long time. Sometimes freedom seems to me a mirage, an unattainable concept that we can theorize about, but never fully grasp. As citizens growing up the way we did, we are bound to our very limited lifestyle, to our culture, to our ideology and agreed upon philosophies. As humans, we can understand reality only through senses that limit us to a single, tunnel-vision perspective. What I wouldn't give to just see the world in someone else's eyes...

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  29. Reading the required text over the summer left me with a bitter taste in my mouth. Often times I trudged through essays by mediocre, pompous people who descended from their self-made thrones to impart their knowledge upon the lost youth of today. Nearly always skipped over those.
    There were some diamonds in the rough, those smart enough to realize what was important enough to live by. By far and away, the one essay that stood out to me was Oscar Hammerstein's "Happy Talk."

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/16609/

    This is powerful stuff, folks. I loved it.

    "I have an unusual statement to make. I am a man who believes he is happy. What makes it unusual is that a man who is happy seldom tells anyone."

    What really shook me was that happiness is really end goal of life, ultimately for any walk of life. Everyone wants to be happy, make someone else happy, or the like. Hammerstein found it, and in doing so laid out the path for anyone wishing to achieve the same. He's not demanding you live his lifestyle, simply stating how he stumbled upon happiness and giving the reader that option as well. It's not life advice - it's words of wisdom from a humble man.

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  30. In reading This I Believe essays, I have come across many essay which inspire me and many with which I agree and in contrast many with which I disagree. However, there are some that I particularly admire and would like to share.

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/16507/

    The statement that most stands out to me from William Douglas' essay is this, "We need a faith that dedicates us to something bigger and more important than ourselves or our possessions." I agree wholeheartedly with this statement. For me, a life with faith in something (someone) bigger than myself gives me purpose and hope.

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/23042/

    I enjoyed this essay for its simplicity and faith.

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/6647/

    This essay makes you realize how simply "being there" can mean the world to someone in need.

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  31. I was in Group 2 (with Bryce).
    I enjoyed our discussion on the nature of freedom. I felt like our discussion involving the physical restraints of physical laws was a bit literal for an abstract concept like freedom. My view on freedom is that it is the ability to choose between all available options at any moment.

    There Is No God - Penn Jillette
    Science Nourishes the Mind and the Soul - Brian Greene

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  32. I was in group 3 and we talked about whether or not philosophy can be therapeutic in the way psychology is. We felt like in the right circumstances it could be. I feel like it's very dependent upon the situation. For instance someone with a severe psychological disorder should probably seek a more traditional type of treatment such as psychotherapy or medication. On the other hand if the problem was not as serious, philosophical discussion could potentially help someone enrich his or her life.

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  33. Holly Aslinger2:17 PM CST

    I was in the group 3 discussion and among what others have said before me, we discussed how everyone has a personal philosophy, and that choosing not to have one or choosing not to contemplate searing metaphysical questions is also a personal philosophy in its own right.

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/12446/
    This essay is about not allowing others to define you.

    http://thisibelieve.org/essay/22868/
    I like this essay because as someone who is very introverted and typically shy, I strive to get out of my comfort zone more often.

    H01

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  34. http://thisibelieve.org/essay/25202/
    HO1
    I really identified with this one. Its topic is about interracial marriage and interracial couples, and the reactions and judgements they receive from others. As seen in recent events such a #Fergusson, racial problems and divisions are obviously still present in modern American. As a result, interracial couples are usually heavily judged for dating outside their race, facing judgements from each side of the racial coin. Since I am in a interracial relationship with my Korean girlfriend, I can empathize with this. To me, it never matters what our races our. We are both humans, and we each care for each other and want the best for each other. The color of our skin doesn't matter to us, as it should not matter to anyone. I believe that race should not be a consideration, and should not be a source of judgement, and I think that this article does a great job of speaking about this.

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