Up@dawn 2.0

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Final Report Epicurus Part 4 of 4

Epicureanism, Epicurean Paradox, Legacy

            Epicureanism is the philosophical system of the philosopher Epicurus. This system held the belief that the external world is a series of fortuitous combinations of atoms. On top of that, Epicureanism states that the “highest good is pleasure, interpreted as freedom from disturbance or pain.” The idea of Epicureanism simply just follows the lifestyle and teachings of Epicurus.

            There was a paradox created by Epicurean that is his understanding of the problem of evil. The argument in simple states that “God is omnipotent, God is good, but Evil exists” Epicurus has a famous quote that elaborates on this;

“Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent.
Is he able, but not willing?
Then he is malevolent.
Is he both able and willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able nor willing?
Then why call him God?”

            Epicurus left a long-standing impression after his death. During his life Epicurus bought property with a house and a garden. This house was outside Athens and close to the Academy. The Garden became a symbol for the detachment and teachings of the school. Epicurus’s teachings also surfaced up later on in Western intellect. Epicurus discussed a human’s right to “life, liberty, and safety.” This was later picked up by John Locke, who wrote about people’s “right to life, liberty, and property”

“Death does not concern us, because as long as we exist, death is not here. And when it does come, we no longer exist.” 


― Epicurus

2 comments:

  1. Epicurean happiness has its appeal. "Got to get ourselves back to the Garden" might mean Eden, but it might also mean the place where E and his friends hung out. There's a recent book called "Travels with Epicurus" you might enjoy.

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  2. Remember me saying it was important to post the first installment a couple of weeks ago and then space subsequent posts by a few days, so as to avoid having them all stacked up at the last minute?

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