Up@dawn 2.0

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Mathematics and Religion

My mind has been pondering the same inquiries as before about Science and Religion, and the concept of the golden mean, geometry, and the natural absolute truth that composes all of these. Perhaps the final conclusion is that the natural absolute truth in God. In a Spinozan fashion, that which is all-encompassing and unexplained must be some power greater than ourselves and must be god. On Pg. 334, it is stated that "when math yields a pattern of harmonious proportion...he is standing at the threshold for truth. I also found interest in the concept of Newton conducting biblical research. It seems that every great character that has contributed to some astounding discovery within the Platonic and Aristotelian tradition has had also a simultaneous study within religion. So too in ym parapaetic walks and my rationalizations about nature have I thought about the harmonious relationship between myself and God. From my cave-dwelling within the world of books, internet, television, and even my sleepy thoughts pondered before I finally fall asleep, those same thoughts are carried with my into the realm of knowledge and into the sun. Where they seem to find some sort of relaxation and heightened consciousness unbeknownst to me living in my cave-like structure. It seems that Galileo completed an identical task, we he took his inquires and placed them above the stars and concluded that God is behind nature and reason. It seems the two are distinct. Reason existing within the cave that is our mind and nature being that extraneous substance. When the two formally meet one another, there exists God.

1 comment:

  1. "In a Spinozan fashion, that which is all-encompassing and unexplained must be some power greater than ourselves and must be god." Spinoza's God, and Einstein's, is an intriguing thing to contemplate... but it's not really a "thing," and most religionists historically have said it's not really God, eitehr. I wonder if it's really "greater than ourselves," or if it just IS ourselves regarded as natural beings inseparably connected with one another and embedded in a common natural matrix?

    "It seems that every great character that has contributed to some astounding discovery within the Platonic and Aristotelian tradition has had also a simultaneous study within religion." So it seems, so far, but the Enlightenment and then the 19th century are about to take a hard turn towards secular humanism. Some will still insist on calling IT religion, too, or faith, or spirituality. We'll see.

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