Up@dawn 2.0

Monday, August 26, 2019

Quiz Aug 28/29

Truthiness (U@d 8.28.19). Our first daily quiz includes questions about keeping score (which we'll do every day to track and inspire participation). Quiz questions are eligible for inclusion on the exams. Your "learning outcome" should be to learn the answers to these questions. 

1. Name two of the ways you can earn a base in our class. (See "course requirements" & other info in the sidebar & on the syllabus)

2. How many bases must you earn each class, to "circle the diamond" and claim your daily participation run on the scorecard?

3. How do you earn your first base in each class?

4. If you posted just one comment before class, what will you mark on the scorecard?

5. How can you earn bases on days when you're not present?

6. Suppose you came to class one day, turned on the computer/projector and opened the CoPhi site,and had posted a comment, a discussion question, an alternate quiz question, AND a link to a relevant YouTube video before class. Did you earn your daily participation run?

7. Did you have any "extra bases" in the scenario posed in the previous question?

8. How can you indicate extra bases on the scorecard?

9. What are Dr. Oliver's office hours? Where is his office? What is his email address?
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READ: William James, Pragmatism lecture 1 (excerpt below); WATCHWhat's Philosophy for?  School of Life (SoL)

10. What does James consider the most interesting and important thing about each of us?

11. How does James define "the philosophy which is so important in each of us"?

12. What's the difference between "tough- and tender-minded" philosophies?

13. What philosopher tried "to justify the ways of God to man, and to prove that the world we live in is the best of possible worlds", and what did James think of him?

14. According to the video "What is Philosophy For?," being wise means what?
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FL 1-2
15. What "remarkable phrase" was the catalyst for Kurt Andersen in writing Fantasyland?

16. Who coined "truthiness"?

17. Why does Andersen think Americans are so fantasy-prone?

18. What two big ideas of Martin Luther's set the stage for "Fantasyland"?

Discussion Questions (DQ) - Post comments on any or all of these, or any other discussion question(s) you or your classmates come up with.
  • What's your definition of "philosophy"? 
  • Do you have a favorite philosopher? 
  • Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy of life? 
  • Russell * says philosophy occupies the No Man's Land between science and theology (xiii). Are scientists and theologians not philosophical? Or are they philosophical in a way different from Russell's? Do you like his definition of philosophy? Are you philosophical, by his definition?
  • Is your duty to God more imperative than your duty to the state, to your fellow citizens, or to humanity? xvi
  • Does Copernican astronomy influence your personal philosophy? How? (Or, why not?) xviii
  • Do you acknowledge the authority of any individuals or institutions to interpret the truth for you? WHy or why not? xx
  • What's your definition of "reality"? 
  • Do you think you have a right to your own facts, as well as your own opinions?
  • [I invite you to post your comments on these questions, on the assigned reading, and on the additional material below... and to post your own Discussion Questions as well. Keep track in your personal log of everything you post. You get to claim another base on the scorecard for each posted comment, DQ, relevant link, or alternative quiz question you can document.]
  •  
When William James published a series of lectures on ‘Pragmatism: A New Name for an Old way of Thinking’ in 1907, he began by identifying ‘The Present Dilemma in Philosophy’ (1907: 9ff), a fundamental and apparently un-resolvable clash between two ways of thinking about things. He promised that pragmatism would show us the way to overcome this dilemma and, having thus shown us its importance, he proceeded, in the second lecture, to explain ‘What Pragmatism Means’... (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), continues here)
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Robert Richardson's excellent book on James here... Mine here... More on James here
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Image result for william james
James with his friend, neighbor, and philosophical frenemy Josiah Royce, on the stone wall at James's summer estate in Chocorua NH.

Lecture I. — The Present Dilemma in Philosophy

In the preface to that admirable collection of essays of his called 'Heretics,' Mr. Chesterton writes these words: "There are some people—and I am one of them—who think that the most practical and important thing about a man is still his view of the universe. We think that for a landlady considering a lodger, it is important to know his income, but still more important to know his philosophy. We think that for a general about to fight an enemy, it is important to know the enemy's numbers, but still more important to know the enemy's philosophy. We think the question is not whether the theory of the cosmos affects matters, but whether, in the long run, anything else affects them."
I think with Mr. Chesterton in this matter. I know that you, ladies and gentlemen, have a philosophy, each and all of you, and that the most interesting and important thing about you is the way in which it determines the perspective in your several worlds. You know the same of me. And yet I confess to a certain tremor at the audacity of the enterprise which I am about to begin. For the philosophy which is so important in each of us is not a technical matter; it is our more or less dumb sense of what life honestly and deeply means. It is only partly got from books; it is our individual way of just seeing and feeling the total push and pressure of the cosmos. I have no right to assume that many of you are students of the cosmos in the class-room sense, yet here I stand desirous of interesting you in a philosophy which to no small extent has to be technically treated. I wish to fill you with sympathy with a contemporaneous tendency in which I profoundly believe, and yet I have to talk like a professor to you who are not students. Whatever universe a professor believes in must at any rate be a universe that lends itself to lengthy discourse. A universe definable in two sentences is something for which the professorial intellect has no use. No faith in anything of that cheap kind! I have heard friends and colleagues try to popularize philosophy in this very hall, but they soon grew dry, and then technical, and the results were only partially encouraging. So my enterprise is a bold one. The founder of pragmatism himself recently gave a course of lectures at the Lowell Institute with that very word in its title-flashes of brilliant light relieved against Cimmerian darkness! None of us, I fancy, understood ALL that he said—yet here I stand, making a very similar venture.
I risk it because the very lectures I speak of DREW—they brought good audiences. There is, it must be confessed, a curious fascination in hearing deep things talked about, even tho neither we nor the disputants understand them. We get the problematic thrill, we feel the presence of the vastness. Let a controversy begin in a smoking-room anywhere, about free-will or God's omniscience, or good and evil, and see how everyone in the place pricks up his ears. Philosophy's results concern us all most vitally, and philosophy's queerest arguments tickle agreeably our sense of subtlety and ingenuity.
Believing in philosophy myself devoutly, and believing also that a kind of new dawn is breaking upon us philosophers, I feel impelled, per fas aut nefas, to try to impart to you some news of the situation.
Philosophy is at once the most sublime and the most trivial of human pursuits. It works in the minutest crannies and it opens out the widest vistas. It 'bakes no bread,' as has been said, but it can inspire our souls with courage; and repugnant as its manners, its doubting and challenging, its quibbling and dialectics, often are to common people, no one of us can get along without the far-flashing beams of light it sends over the world's perspectives. These illuminations at least, and the contrast-effects of darkness and mystery that accompany them, give to what it says an interest that is much more than professional... (Pragmatism Lecture 1 continues here)
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The following material, and generally anything posted below the daily quiz and DQs,  is (as they say in Cajun country) lagniappe. Take it or leave it, it's not required but you might find it instructive or interesting.

 *




A distinguished panel addresses this question on the occasion of the publication of Professor James Miller's new book, Examined Lives: From Socrates to Nietzsche. Panelists include Simon Critchley, professor of philosophy at The New School for Social Research and author of The Book of Dead Philosophers; Anthony Gottlieb, author of The Dream of Reason, a three-volume history of philosophy; James Miller, professor of political science and chair of the Committee on Liberal Studies at The New School for Social Research; Astra Taylor, independent filmmaker and director of Zizek! and Examined Life: Philosophy Is in the Streets; and Cornel West, author of Race Matters and Class of 1943 Professor at Princeton University. The panel will be moderated by Lewis H. Lapham, editor of Lapham's Quarterly.
Also recommended: Look on the This I Believe website for essays you like, and post links to them; TIB II William James, Pragmatism lecture 1; WATCH:What's Philosophy for? School of Life (SoL). LISTEN: What is Philosophy?and Who's Your Favourite Philosopher?(PB Philosophy Bites)
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* "Philosophy" is a word which has been used in many ways,
some wider, some narrower. I propose to use it in a very wide sense, which I will now try to explain. Philosophy, as I shall understand the word, is something inter- mediate between theology and science. Like theology, it consists of speculations on matters as to which definite knowledge has, so far, been unascertainable ; but like science, it appeals to human reason rather than to authority, whether that of tradition or that of revelation. All definite knowledge so I should contend belongs to science ; all dogma as to what surpasses definite know- ledge belongs to theology. But between theology and science there is a No Man's Land, exposed to attack from both sides; this No Man's Land is philosophy. Almost all the questions of most interest to speculative minds are such as science cannot answer, and the confident answers of theologians no longer seem so con- vincing as they did in former centuries. Is the world divided into mind and matter, and, if so, what is mind and what is matter? Is mind subject to matter, or is it possessed of independent powers ? Has the universe any unity or purpose? Is it evolving towards some goal ? Are there really laws of nature, or do we believe in them only because of our innate love of order ? Is man what he seems to the astronomer, a tiny lump of impure carbon and water impotently crawling on a small and unimportant planet ? Or is he what he appears to Hamlet ? Is he perhaps both at once ? Is there a way of living that is noble and another that is base, or are all ways of living merely futile? If there is a way of living that is noble, in what does it consist, and how shall we achieve it? Must the good be eternal in order to deserve to be valuc'd, or is it worth seeking even if the universe is inexorably moving toward? death ?

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An old post:


That's the Philosophy Bites question we take up today in CoPhi. If you think it puts Descartes before the horse you can visit What is Philosophy? first. (That was the first bad phil-pun I heard, btw, from a perky Scot called Cogan on my first day of Grad School back in 1980. Not the last. It was already an old joke.)




We don't all agree on what philosophy is. Not even we "Americanists," amongst ourselves. But we try to disagree agreeably. A little post-HAP 101 exchange between a pair of students once threatened for a moment to become disagreeable (unlike the class itself, which was thrilling in its impassioned civility). Almost made 'em watch the Argument Clinic. "An argument isn't just the automatic gainsaying of any statement the other person makes," etc. etc. But I don't want to argue about that.

Maybe a round of Bruces would be welcome today, simultaneously introducing several stars of philosophy, teaching us how to pronounce "Nietzsche" (and mispronounce "Kant") and disabusing anyone who falsely presumes our subject to be overly sober and serious about itself. If any doubt about that persists, just drop in on the Philosophy Club's Thursday Happy Hour - not that I'd want to reinforce the spurious conceit that philosophers are drunks. G'day.

I don't have a "favourite"... but my favorite (as I've already told my classes, on Day #1) is of


course William James.I don't always agree with him, but I almost always want to know he'd say about the topic du jour.

Philosophy, beginning in wonder, as Plato and Aristotle said, is able to fancy everything different from what it is. It sees the familiar as if it were strange, and the strange as if it were familiar. It can take things up and lay them down again. Its mind is full of air that plays round every subject. It rouses us from our native dogmatic slumber and breaks up our caked prejudices. SPP

My favorite living philosopher is John Lachs. He came for a visit last year, to my CoPhi classes.

It's no surprise that David Hume outpolls everyone on the podcast, given its Anglo-centric tilt, or that Mill and Locke pick up several votes. They're all on my short list too, as is Bertrand Russell (who definitely knew the value of philosophy).

I notice that my Vandy friend Talisse is one of the handful of Americans here, and he, like Martha Nussbaum, picks Mill. Sandel picks Hegel.) Other big votegetters: Aristotle, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein.

No surprise either that James, Dewey, Peirce, Santayana, Rawls, and other prominent Yanks don't win wide favor across the pond. (But I hear the Rawls musical has been a hit with the Brits.)

I did hear an English philosopher praising James once, on the BBC's excellent "In Our Time." But generally they prefer William's "younger, shallower, vainer" (and more Anglophilic) brother Henry, who lived most of his adult life in Sussex.

The British roots of American thought do run deep, and the branches of reciprocal influence spread wide. Stay tuned for info on our Study Aboard course, as it moves from drawing board to future reality.

Why do I find WJ so compelling? Hard to put my finger on a single reason, there are so many. I was first drawn to him through his marvelous personal letters. Then, his essays ("On a Certain Blindness in Human Beings," "The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life," "What Makes a Life Significant") and lectures-cum-books (Varieties of Religious Experience, Pragmatism, A Pluralistic Universe). His warm, charming, playful, disarming, sympathetic personality shone through all. He was so great at tossing off wit, profundity, and practical wisdom with seeming effortlessness and concision. A born tweeter. But his health, physical and emotional, was a lifelong challenge. He expended vast effort to become William James.

Honestly, the best explanation for why I became a lifelong student of, and stroller with, WJ may just be that little moment in the Vandy bookstore back in my first year of grad school - the moment when my new mentor John Compton noticed me browsing the McDermott anthology o fThe Writings. John's warm and enthusiastic familiarity with "Willy James" hooked me. Thank you, John.

The thing James said that's stuck with me longest and made the most lasting impression, I think, is the little piece of youthful advice he once wrote to a despondent friend. I'm not quite sure why, but it lifts my mood every time I think of it:


Remember when old December's darkness is everywhere about you, that the world is really in every minutest point as full of life as in the most joyous morning you ever lived through; that the sun is whanging down, and the waves dancing, and the gulls skimming down at the mouth of the Amazon, for instance, as freshly as in the first morning of creation; and the hour is just as fit as any hour that ever was for a new gospel of cheer to be preached. I am sure that one can, by merely thinking of these matters of fact, limit the power of one's evil moods over one's way of looking at the cosmos.

Is this true? Maybe. Is it useful? Definitely.

We're also looking today at Nigel Warburton's introduction to Philosophy: The Basics.(5th ed., 2013), in which he quite rightly points out that while philosophy can help you think about who you are and why you're here - about the meaning of your life - it isn't an alternative to other fields of study. "It is important not to expect too much of philosophy," to the neglect of literature and history and science and art, et al.

That's right. But it's equally important not to expect too little of yourself, and to think you're not up to the challenge of an examined life. To repeat Professor James's empowering declaration: "I know that you, ladies and gentlemen, have a philosophy, each and all of you, and that the most interesting and important thing about you is the way in which it determines the perspective in your several worlds." If you don't all know that yet, CoPhilosophers, we'd better get to work. Serious fun, dead ahead. 8.27.14
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 The Biggest Misconception About Today’s College Students

You might think the typical college student lives in a state of bliss, spending each day moving among classes, parties and extracurricular activities. But the reality is that an increasingly small population of undergraduates enjoys that kind of life.

Of the country’s nearly 18 million undergraduates, more than 40 percent go to community college, and of those, only 62 percent can afford to go to college full-time. By contrast, a mere 0.4 percent of students in the United States attend one of the Ivies.

The typical student is not the one burnishing a fancy résumé with numerous unpaid internships. It’s just the opposite: Over half of all undergraduates live at home to make their degrees more affordable, and a shocking 40 percent of students work at least 30 hours a week. About 25 percent work full-time and go to school full-time.

The typical college student is also not fresh out of high school. A quarter of undergraduates are older than 25, and about the same number are single parents.

These students work extremely hard to make ends meet and simultaneously get the education they need to be more stable: A two-year degree can earn students nearly 20 percent more annually than just a high school diploma... (continues, nyt)
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LISTEN:

107 comments:

  1. One definition of philosophy I found, that sort of resonated with me I suppose, came from Barry Smith when he said, "[Philosophy is] thinking fundamentally, clearly, and well about the nature of reality and our place in it; so as to understand what goes on around us and what our contribution is to that reality." To put it in my own words: Thinking on, in a sense, what reality is, how it affects us, and how we affect it in return.

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    1. Found in the philosophy bites podcast.
      http://philosophybites.com/2010/11/what-is-philosophy.html

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    2. George H039:29 PM CDT

      Forgot the H03, my bad.

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    3. "whats your definition of philosophy?"
      I believe philosophy is experience , knowledge , and time. Without time one does not have experience and without experience one can not obtain knowledge they gained in the experience they had within time. Philosophy is ones view on multiple things that surround this universe. Philosophy is the understatement of one to know what it means to have an open mind and the willingness to makes mistakes and know you find growth within mistakes which you gain experience from to build your own philosophy from. Philosophy can come from many places meaning the way one has grown up to how one views life itself and triumphs in a negative or positive way. Philosophy is free. Philosophy is time. Philosophy is you.

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  2. H3
    What's your definition of "philosophy"?
    I believe philosophy is questioning the world around you and attempting to make sense of it in your own way.
    Do you have a favorite philosopher?
    I do not, but I hope to find one through this class.
    Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy of life?
    I feel like this life is all we get so you might as well make the best of it. I hope to grow as a person throughout life. I also aim to treat others with respect and to spread happiness wherever I roam.

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    1. H3
      That's a good personal philosophy I'd say.
      I feel like treating others with respect and kindness can only benefit you in the end! :)

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    2. Cami Farr H-037:05 AM CDT

      I personally agree with you on that. I feel like as long as we are here we should treat others with kindness. If more people share that philosophy maybe our world would be a little better off.

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  3. Anonymous9:35 PM CDT

    My definition of philosophy is having that, “sublime,” feeling all the time. Philosophy is this unimaginable upkeep of ideas and knowledge. Simply, philosophy to me is the eruption of knowledge that changes the path of generations. That’s all I hear about philosophers the first ones to see the world changing; the first ones to change the world.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. H01
      I actually like that a lot. I believe that philosophy is all about questioning things that other people don't think to question, and obtaining those answers gives them a sense of satisfaction that others don't understand.

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  4. Anastasia Hanes H-0310:46 PM CDT

    Philosophy, by its etymology, means the love of wisdom which is somewhat accurate, if a bit vague. Philosophy is the study, pursuit, and cultivation of a mind that holds wisdom. It is the act of trying to understand and explain abstract concepts relating to human life and experience with the world around us. There isn’t really one completely accurate or descriptive definition that is going to work for everyone because much like the study itself it is hard to confine into a universally accurate ideas that will fit everyone’s experiences. In my mind, philosophy is the art and science of trying to understand concepts, feelings, ideas, and experiences that are both personal and universal in a way that provides some level of insight.

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    1. Anastasia Hanes H-0310:51 PM CDT

      Continuing on, my current personal philosophy might be something like “Everything must always balance itself back out.” I think that everything in the world has to have a counterpart that balances. I think that everyone and everything has to have equal quantities of opposites. If you have a bad day you must, at some point in time, have an equally good one. If you say something stupid or hurtful than that same hindrance will come back on you. If you work very hard there must also be a period of laxness in equal magnitude. Whatever you put out into the world comes back on you and whatever the world takes must eventually be given back. It is a bit vague right now but it is the little common string that influences how I think and behave in my life.

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    2. On the topic of my favorite philosopher, I had a bit more trouble. At this early point I can’t say that I have a favorite philosopher. I haven’t given the subject much study before beyond the history of philosophy in ancient Greece. At this time I feel I am probably favoring the Imperialist ideals as I don’t think experience should or can be discounted in studying philosophy but I have very limited exposure at this point to philosophers in general. I feel it would be dishonest or a cop out to simple look for the first philosopher whose ideas somewhat appeal to me and claim them as my favorite because it would be a shallow appraisal and completely circumvent the point of picking a favorite philosopher if I don’t actually know much of anything about them. That said, I have found from basic information that I am interested in learning more about several recent figures. I find Peter Singer’s interest in how people think about non-human animals interesting and within the somewhat familiar realm of some anthropological studies I’ve read. Tyler Burge also piqued my interest with his study of how a person’s thoughts and self are not entirely self-determined but rather influenced by their environment, though I don’t yet really understand his argument fully so I can’t say if my interest is because I agree or disagree. I hope that as I learn how to navigate the higher levels of the methodology I can form some stronger opinions and understand the literature a bit better but for now I will reserve the right to select a “favorite.”

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  5. Adriana H310:52 PM CDT

    I think philosophy is trying to find an understanding about the world and asking questions about that which you don't understand. I don't have much knowledge on philosophers so I hope to find a favorite during this class. For my personal philosophy on life I feel that we should use our time trying to benefit the lives of others.

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    1. Maybe you will find that your favorite philosopher is you. life is all about figuring yourself out and we as humans are not meant to know everything otherwise we would know everything which wouldnt cause for college haha. But , i love your idea on it. Dont stop being you :)

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  6. My current, personal philosophy on life is that we should all strive to be "good", selfless, and productive.

    What constitutes "good" is not very black and white and does not need to be tied to religion and God and not wanting to go to hell. We don't need religion to instill fear of afterlife punishment to scare us into being good, decent people. I could describe "good" as something that you do that does not harm others and that which you do that improves you. Then again, you can be "good" at the cost of others, making others unhappy. So is what you did still "good" at that point? My thoughts are incomplete on this.

    I also believe that all aspects of life need to be dealt with moderation. Too much of anything is not good for you. Too much of religion makes extremists. People who indulge in everything that makes them happy, who live a hedonistic lifestyle, miss out on productivity and selflessness. Even an over-indulgence in philosophy, or any subject, can be harmful to you. At what point do we get to stop being skeptical and accept that maybe there are some things that we cannot explain at the moment through logic and reason from an empiricist view?

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  7. Cami Farr H-037:14 AM CDT

    My current definition of philosophy is something along the lines of seeking to gain wisdom through what ever one is doing at the time. I feel that no matter what we are doing we could always learn something more through that process even if at the time we find it trivial.
    I dont really have a favorite philosopher yet but I'm hoping that I can find one or maybe even a few over the course of the semester.
    I do hawever have a personal philosophy that we as humans should try to do small acts of kindness or good wherever we can.

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    1. section 13,

      I really like your personal philosophy considering how little of it there is these days, also I agree philosophy is about expanding your knowledge and finding your personal beliefs.

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  8. Caleb McBride-H3
    I believe philosophy is the process of finding out what you believe and finding your own way in the world via a direct and intentional questioning of that world. I have never given much thought to my favorite philosopher but hopefully that will change throughout the course of this class. However, when it comes to my personal philosophy, I feel like life is what you make of it, so we should do out best to foster positive relationships, better ourselves, and experience as much as possible so that we can become the best version of ourselves.

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    1. I like your definition. There are questions that a lot of people don't ask because the answer could be complicated, but philosophers embrace those questions because it gives them knowledge that no one else has.

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  9. Cami Farr H-0312:30 PM CDT

    So I just finished my psychology class and found out that psychology is essentially a newer science that is based off of emperical philosophy. It makes sense I suppose since psychology is essentially the study of how living beings process and gain knowledge.

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  10. H01
    I'm not a deeply religious person, and I don't know if anyone else in this course is either, but my personal philosophy does happen to relate to God. Simply put, it's "everything happens for a reason." Once I put it into a religious perspective, it's "God doesn't allow anything to happen to someone that that person cannot handle." Some pretty terrible things have happened to not only myself, but to millions of other people all over the world over the past few years, and even though we may be a world divided, almost everyone still finds a way to get up in the morning. Even if I feel like I'm doing everything I could possibly be doing wrong, I always know that it's going to lead to something good.

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    1. For my definition of philosophy, I believe that it's the practice of questioning things that either other people don't think to ask, or that other people are too afraid to ask. Philosophers have such an in depth view of the world because they look at perspectives that others don't seem to think is important, and that limits the mindset of everyone around them.

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    2. Following that, my definition of reality is knowing that something has happened and knowing what is going to happen from that.

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    3. I have certain quotes from philosophers that I like to apply to my daily life, but when it comes to picking out one philosopher to be my favorite above all others, I have to say that I can't make a decision. Hopefully this class exposes me to some new philosophers and maybe I can even decide on a favorite by the end of the semester.

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    4. Sky Strube H015:37 PM CDT

      I'm quite religious and the advice I give to people most frequently is "God will never give you anything you can't handle." That phrase has gotten me and some others I know through a lot. Thanks for putting it out there!

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  11. Erica Combs5:17 PM CDT

    H1-
    Who am I? I am a pretty stubborn female who enjoys company of her closest friends and family. I am much more of a listener than a talker unless the topics are books, music, or comedians. I have lived in Johnson City, TN my whole life (up to this point) which explains my deeply rooted love for the mountains. I am open to new experiences, new people, new ideas; however, it takes a while for me the recharge my energy levels after a day of many "news". I am here at MTSU to pursue an International Relations major with a minor in Russian Studies. I hope to make many friends and enjoy my time here!

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  12. Sky Strube H015:33 PM CDT

    My definition definition of philosophy is seeking out understanding of the world around you and all of it's parts. I don't have a favorite philosopher yet, but I'm sure I'll come across one during this course. My personal philosophy is no matter what I'm doing, do it well. I try to apply this to my coursework, my daily life, my religious practice, and more.

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    1. I like the perspective of doing things well in all aspects of your life. I think that has become a lost virtue.

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    2. It's such a simple philosophy to live by, but its incredible how many people seem to have trouble applying that to their lives.

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  13. (H01) My definition of philosophy would be a search for truth, and a pursuit of truth's virtues. By that, I mean- "finding" truth doesn't really do you any good unless you put it into practice and use that wisdom.
    I think my own personal philosophy is just to be happy and to do good. By good, I mean to live in love because whoever lives in love, lives in God, and God in Him. And that is my goal in my pursuit of truth.

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    1. That's actually a really good point that I didn't even think about. Knowing the truth is on thing, but actually recognizing that truth and using it in your life is something that most people don't really do.

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    2. Both of you are on a good track. One of the most interesting ideas of Socrates was his belief in the unity of thought and practice. More specifically, he thought that no one knowingly did wrong. Wrong or immoral behavior was a result of ignorance. If people could get "what is right" clear in their mind, they would follow it up with right action. What do you think about this? If philosophy is useful because it can help us identity the truth so that we might act on it, is it ever possible that we might know the truth and still "live a lie?"

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  14. My definition of philosophy is the set of beliefs or thoughts that one has based on their own understanding and interpretation of the world. As of now, I don't have a great understanding of philosophy, but I hope to understand it better once I discover what my own personal philosophy is. (H01)

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    1. You will find it along the way the more you find yourself. Philosophy is your own view make it what youd like it to be. Philosophy isnt a perfect thing , dont hope - do :)

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  15. Erica Combs9:58 PM CDT

    H1-
    Philosophy is the way one shapes their mind to see the world. It's a powerful tool that is diverse throughout the minds of the planet's population. I have yet to explore the many different philosophers out there. My current personal philosophy includes the mantra that "nothing is permanent" which allows me to enjoy the fleeting jovial moments in life and to wait out the bad.

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    1. Your philosophy sounds very Buddhist, Erica! Fortunately, we should cover some Eastern philosophies before we march into the Western ones.

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  16. (H02)
    I think in my definition, philosophy is the set of beliefs you hold to be true about how you approach the world in any given situation. My favorite philosopher has to be Diogenes, there's a part of my that just loves the way he dealt with every situation we have recorded of him. My current philosophy for life is mostly just trying to make other peoples' lives more nice and interesting while I still have a chance to.

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  17. I see philosophy as a way of seeing the world that shapes how you thing, act, and believe in daily life. Philosophy is central to who we are as people. It includes our morals and beliefs in particular. Personally, my religious beliefs influence a lot of my philosophy. Overall, I believe that as people we should serve and support one another. To be kind, giving, and selfless.
    (H01)

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  18. (H2) I actually find it very difficult to create my own meaning of philosophy. This is a subject I have not been exposed to for most of my life and since I was not used to it, I tried to avoid it as I got older but recently I have started to have a lot of questions and I am curious to see if learning more about this subject will help me find out some answers.
    I decided to research a little and found out that the word philosophy comes from 2 greek words, ‘Philo’ and ‘Sophia’. The word “philo” means ‘love’ and the word ‘sophia’ means wisdom. This really intrigued my curiosity. The way Pythagoras explains philosophy is that it is only acquired by the gods and only they are to be called wise men and ‘lovers’ of wisdom. So philosophy stems back to wisdom and wisdom is the knowledge of being able to think and decide what is right and what is wrong. Pythagoras saw that only gods had wisdom and are to be called philosophers. However, I disagree with him.
    I believe that every person has his own philosophy that he shapes over the years. This philosophy is defined by life experiences and what he or she chooses to believe in. Like Dr. Oliver mentioned, every person has a philosophy that they might have not been able to put into words yet. Therefore, I am really looking forward to see how this class is going to help me articulate my own philosophy.

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  19. Kenna [#H-02]1:11 AM CDT

    [ Kenna - #H-02 ]

    "Is your duty to God more imperative than your duty to the state, to your fellow citizens, or to humanity?"

    I would say no. Although religion is interest to me, it does not personally drive my life. Simply put, I find it personally hard to process and believe in religion which is part of my interest in it. I can go about my life perfectly fine having no belief in something greater or worst in the "afterlife" or that things in life were "out of my control". I simply wish to go about my life living it in a way I am personally proud of for me and in that.

    "What's your definition of "reality"?"

    Honestly, I'm not all too sure how I could word it. It might be a very simply and primitive mindset but I suppose if something "exists" there it is, to me, a reality? Reality is, I think, something really complex and probably far beyond what I've really given consideration. In comparison, silly stories and ideas I have in my brain, I would not consider them a reality following this basic definition I have because it's all been make up by me, simply it doesn't honestly exist.

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  20. Hey yall, posted my discussion question answers on the introduction page instead of here by accident like the uneducated internet user that I am. Soo yeah. Not gonna write that a second time. If any of you got time go read it there so I have a witness in case my man Oliver accuses me of not doing it. Thanks.

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  21. Kristy: #H-01
    "What is your definition of philosophy?"
    To be entirely honest, in the beginning I was not quite sure of what philosophy is. The class intrigued me though. I pondered what the topic even was before I attempted to stick a definition to it. After much thought I have decided that the definition is rather simple. I believe that philosophy is just asking the questions that not many are willing to ask. Those who are capable of breaking the social and internal norm by attempting to grasp concepts and answers that have managed to elude men and women for a great deal of time.

    Bam.

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    1. Nice, Kristy! Now, if philosophers are those who ask questions "that not many are willing to ask," then where do you think that places them in society? Are they noble figures who offer a service to society or are they annoying disrupters who bother with impractical matters. Some of your peers, like Cassedy below, seem to question the value of philosophical questions. What do you think? And can you think of anyone who practiced philosophy as you so succintly defined it?

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  22. Cassedy: H-02

    "What is your definition of philosophy?"
    I believe that philosophy is essentially theorizing about parts of our existence that are important to us. Some people's philosophies are quite simple, involving just short statements about their own realities of thinking, while others tend to be more complex, examining and analyzing the world around us. Philosophy is a lot of things, I guess. Originally I was in this class just for the honors credit, but already it has become a lot more interesting and thought provoking.

    "Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy on life?"
    Let's see... I prefer to look at life as a constant pursuit of excellence. I avoid questions like "Why are we here?" and "What is our purpose?" Due to my focus on the here and now. To me it matters less why things are the way they are than how our society can continue to develop in a way that it will become more diverse over time. I believe that philosophies of people evolve and grow based on their time here on earth. Through introspection, those philosophies come into a clearer light.

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  23. Anonymous10:53 AM CDT

    H-02 Kayla Morton
    Do you think you have a right to your own facts, as well as your own opinions?
    "Every one is entitled to his or her own opinions" is a phrase heard quite frequently, but usually when two or more people cannot agree on an issue or a stance to take on that issue. It is a way to dismiss the conversation altogether. By definition opinion means "a view or judgment formed about something, not necessarily based on fact or knowledge". In other words an opinion is someone's perspective on a situation, and since it can neither be proven nor disproved, no one can take your right to it away. They may dismiss your opinion due to their unwillingness to hear how you feel,but that doesn't change the fact that you feel a certain way to begin with.
    By definition fact means "a thing that is indisputably the case". Basically something that has certainty or actuality. Reality actually comes up as a synonym for fact, which I think blurs the line on what a fact actually is a little bit. Facts such as the sky is blue or water covers the majority of the Earth's surface are indisputable. They can be proven. But if a fact is a reality, the door for people to have their own facts begins to open. Everyone has their own reality, "the world or the state of things as they actually exist" to each individual. I think that there are two different kinds of facts based upon whether you think of a fact as something to be tested and proven or whether you think of a fact as a reality. Proven facts, such as those that are scientific may be the same for everyone, but everyone has their own reality and no one's reality is exactly the same. I hope that made sense..

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  24. I define philosophy as the pursuit of the complete truth of reality. My favorite philosopher is not a big name philosopher or known as a philosopher at all, but Christopher McCandles, he was sort of a combo of henry david Thoreau and jack London because of his love of the wilderness and transcendentalist views of material possessions.

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    1. That's awesome. What do you define as reality then? When do you know you grasped the truth? I looked up your favorite philosopher Christopher McCandless! His biography seems very interesting albeit a tad bit sad. It's sad to see that he passed away, and we still do not know the cause of his death.

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  25. Emily Caprio12:57 PM CDT

    Emily Caprio - #H02

    "What is your definition of philosophy?"
    Philosophy seems to be a simple subject to some people, as it claims to be the discussion of life. However, to me, philosophy is much more than that. Not only is it just the discussion of life, it is discussing ways to live, views on life, opinions on happiness, etc. Philosophy breaks down all of the complex meanings of the ways of life in such a way that every person has a right answer simply because philosophy is individualized. Philosophy is not defined by one certain definition. It is whatever each person claims it to be. And, in my eyes, that is the beauty of philosophy.

    "Do you have a favorite philosopher?"
    My favorite philosopher is Alan Watts. His philosophy on the world is heavily influenced by Buddhism, but he is a maverick thinker, and, in my opinion, an amazing speaker. I am always mesmerized by his speeches.

    "Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy on life?"
    I cannot dive too far into my philosophical view on life, however, I can say that my simple philosophy is do what makes you happy. One of my favorite Alan Watts quotes is “Never pretend to a love which you do not actually feel, for love is not ours to command.” To me, this advises to do what makes love come naturally for us. If it is something as simple as riding a bike or even taking a walk in the park, if it strikes a feeling of love and relaxation and wonder, do it. However, if at any time you feel as if you have to force the feeling of love onto something, this most likely means that it was not meant for you. My advise for that topic is to safely diverge from it.

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  26. Madison Berry12:59 PM CDT

    H-02
    As far as defining reality, reality is the truth around you that can not be manipulated. You can control your own actions and perceptions, but you have to accept those of others. If a person bumps into you on a sidewalk, you can not prevent it; however, you choose whether or not to react with hostility. Reality is the environment around you that invoked a reaction or acceptance of an event. While anyone can take actions to impact reality and effect a new quality, ultimately it can not be changed instantaneously.

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  27. 9, TTh 1pm

    A little article that breaks down magical thinking and other logical fallacies that Andersen mentions in Fantasyland.

    https://www.logicallyfallacious.com/tools/lp/Bo/LogicalFallacies/123/Magical-Thinking

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  28. Alternative Quiz Question for Fantasyland:
    What makes "all the lines between actual and fictual blur"?
    H1

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  29. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  30. H-03
    I chose What's your definition of "philosophy"? My definition of philosophy is the investigation/study of ideas about truth, life, wisdom, and knowledge to help further understanding/realization of purpose, existence, and reality.

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  31. I also found this video from crash course that introduces philosophy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1A_CAkYt3GY.

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  32. I accidentally put this in my Introduction post, so I'll drop it here, as well.

    My own personal philosophy is very much a culmination of the axioms of the thinkers I've studied at length, which I would say is very Jungian and Nietzscheian world view, with a little Dostoevsky. That is to say, I believe that the most fundamental truths to human existence are suffering and malevolence, however I share Jung's sympathies that the existence of an archetypal evil to avoid must therefore be proof of an archetypal good to strive for. I think to search for meaning and to live a meaningful life, with all the responsibility and hardships that entails, is a deeply human effort to universally fight for the side of that archetypal good.

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  33. 9

    My definition of philosophy would be the process of updating your direction in life when you're dissatisfied with your current circumstances. That state of dissatisfaction is chronic on some level for all of us. The adjustment isn't usually drastic, although it can be. If life were a single task, discovering one's philosophy could be like determining when done means done, or if there's work yet to do. It's always the latter.

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  34. "What's your definition of 'philosophy'?"
    My definition of philosophy has to be always to look towards facts. Whenever I debate with others, I tend to find that if you mix emotions with logic, it's similar to mixing oil and water. It won't mix together. In fact, it clashes with each other. Even if you try to argue with someone, a fact will remain always a fact. For example, you can not argue logically that Earth does not sustain life. Earth is sustaining life right at this moment! I agreed with Kurt Anderson when he said that we, as Americans, have a tendency to believe what we want to believe despite what experts may have said on the matter. We need to look at facts and not opinions that we wish to be fact when in a debate or a logical setting.

    "Do you have a favorite philosopher?"
    I mentioned it once before, but my favorite philosopher has to Thomas More! He was always willing to put logic and reason before emotions. However, he was also willing to lend a ear to the opposite side. He would try to understand where he or she would be coming from even if they had opposite thoughts. Furthermore, he was willing to fight for what he stood for during a time where you could literally (and he did) lose your life for. I think he's inspiring.

    An alternative Discussion Question could be:
    Who is your least favorite philosopher and why?

    For example, my least favorite philosopher has to be Voltaire. He is quite a popular one, but I never really enjoyed many of his remarks which came of as quite racist to me. But you may have different opinions, and I am willing to hear your opinions!

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  35. Sara Kate Martin 1030-009
    Philosophy to me is your personal view on the universe and how it works. Your philosophy is distinctly yours and based on the thought you devote to exploring and understanding your surroundings.

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    1. I agree with your definition of philosophy as someone's personal view of the universe. However, I think today many people's philosphy comes from talking points they heard on social media or some other source, making people's personal philosophy hardly distinct.

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  36. 9

    I've never really deeply thought about my personal Philosophy or how I would define it, but if I could give some sort of meaning to it, I would say that it stands for how you view yourself in the world. It doesn't really matter what other people around you do. Yes, it may affect you in some way or fashion, but how you respond is completely reliant upon your own thoughts and actions.
    Finding the way that you fit into the world and finding what makes you happy is really the key to life. You can only truly find meaning in your own life.

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    1. I think that's a really important philosophy to have. It has such a loose, but general meaning that is as unique as every person. The trouble we run into as a society, however, is whether or not everyone's personal philosophies are "safe" or if they fit into our deeply ingrained moral codes. But in a perfect world, we would all be free to do what we want without harm to others.

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  37. Kathryn (Abby) Pittman Section 6
    Because I don’t truly understand all the complexities of philosophy at this point, I can’t provide my personal definition of philosophy. According to Merriam Webster Dictionary online, one definition of philosophy is “the most basic beliefs, concepts, and attitudes of an individual or group.” I like this definition because it’s a much more simplified version of the various definitions I’ve seen. I think philosophy is how you personally view and reflect on the ideals you care about the most such as morals. I don’t have a favorite philosopher because, as i mentioned before, I’m not all too familiar with philosophy nor famous philosophers. However, I’m interested to keep expanding my knowledge or the subject and further develop an opinion on common philosophers. As for the question about reality, I find this quite interesting. The definition of reality from google is “the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.” Simply put, reality is what we understand and what we know. It existence allows us to acknowledge it as “real.”

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  38. What's your definition of "philosophy"?

    Philosophy, from my perspective, feels like it has more to do on morals than anything else. The morals you make for yourself tend to change how you view things. What your personality is and how you view the world is shaped by the morals that you either grew up with, or developed later on in life. Somethings tend to stick to people, like moments of pure brilliance or in times of extreme fear or stress. People change as they grow and learn, be it from observation or trial and error. Each person sees the world differently, but morals or ideals set a basis for how one reacts to what they experience.

    Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy of life?

    My favorite quote is by Eleanor Roosevelt:
    "Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do, and damned if you don't."
    To me, it is a statement of saying be who you are, and do not ever feel like you have to hide. Everyone will have something to say, and everyone has their own opinion, but none of that should matter. The only thing that truly matters is what you think of yourself and what you want to accomplish in life. People will criticized you for doing something or not doing anything, the only thing that really matters is what you want to do, and what you want to see change or happen in this world. Make mistakes, take risks and chances that might only come around once in a life time. If you fail, that is only a small moment in the bigger picture. So my personal philosophy is to always do what I think and feel to be right. I might be wrong or I could be right, but I can't let the ideals of someone else tell me I can't try. Either way, it comes out a 50/50 chance of making some sort of change. Be it good or bad, it's a chance for change.

    A question I have: What quote or saying makes an impact with your own philosophy?

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  39. 10,TR-2:40

    What's your definition of "philosophy"?
    My definition of philosophy is that it is a area of study in which people question about the things which are not related to their menial lives to gain more knowledge.

    Do you have a favorite philosopher?
    I do not have a lot of insight about philosophers, but the one I do know and am drawn to is David Hume. The ideology that drew me to Hume was that how we never really know who we are, we only think that we know about ourselves because of our collection of sensations. This really made me think, it really connected to me. I started to question myself and I still continue to do so till date.

    "Is your duty to God more imperative than your duty to the state, to your fellow citizens, or to humanity?"
    I personally am a believer in God, but I do not feel that our duty should ever be more imperative to God. I feel that guilt of not being true to ourselves is something that we can never substituted with anything.

    Do you think you have a right to your own facts, as well as your own opinions?
    Yes, I feel that one does have a right to their own facts, as well as thier opinions because each mind thinks differently and one cannot reject another person as they never know why someone feels something or thinks something.

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  40. 10, TR-2:40
    I also found this youtube playlist with a lot of videos about western philosphers and their ideals.

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwxNMb28XmpeypJMHfNbJ4RAFkRtmAN3P

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  41. So, like many of you guys here on the blog, one of my favorite philosophers is Alan Watts. I think the only way I can describe my personal philosophy is through a quote of his: "Trying to describe yourself is like trying to bite your own teeth." I think we all get lost in who we are, who we were, or who we are trying to be. We lose focus of who we really are in our heart of hearts when we try and put labels on ourselves. Labels can't possibly capture every aspect of a person. We have too many quirks, too many different personalities, reactions, backgrounds, sexualities, priorities, and it would be silly to even attempt to squeeze one single person, made up of all of these different and wonderful things, down into a couple of sentences. Every single person, no matter how similar they are, is nothing like any other person in the entire world.

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  42. 10 TR 2:40 - What's your definition of "philosophy"?
    My defintion of philosphy is the practice of trying to understand the who, what and why behind everything that makes up reality. people's personal philosophies are their understanding of the world around them. This includes who they are, how they got here, and why they get up in the morning.

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  43. "What's your definition of reality"
    To me, reality doesn't have a set in stone definition being that what is "real" is interpreted by individual experience and belief. The differences in "worlds" and "lives" and the opportunities we face from them, good or bad, creates unique perception to what and how a situation is displayed to someone's eye and mind, leaving it up to the individual to analyze it in their own way. This can be determined by things such as social class, race, sex, financial well-being, inherited beliefs, etc.

    This is a transition to my answer to the question, "Do you believe you have the right to your own facts, as well as your own opinions?" "Facts" by definition are things known or proved to be true. Facts, in my opinion, are dependent on what your "reality" is and what is true to your life, because if you can prove or support your point with something logical or concrete, wouldn't it then be considered a fact by definition? For example, it's is a "fact" that the sky is the color described to us as blue, because we can see it and point it out. Likewise, it would be a fact, to someone who is colorblind or doesn't interpret color the same as the majority, that "the sky is blue" is a false statement or in fact another color in which, by their vision, would prove.

    "Do you acknowledge the authority of any individuals or institutions to interpret the truth for you? Why or why not?"

    I don't acknowledge the authority of people to interpret the truth for me, because I believe that is systematic once it has been told a certain amount of times by people I know are only saying it because that is what they were taught or told to say. I approach new ideas with the phrase in mind that "there are always two sides to a story." I believe there is always a rebuttal or other opinion that should be considered before something is deemed true or correct.




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  44. Section 10 TR 2:40
    Philosophy to me means figuring out and pondering all the questions about life. Specifically, what we do, why we do it, why we are here, and how to do it while we are here.

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  45. Section 10 TR 2:40
    A brief summary of my personal philosophy is as follows: I think we are on this planet to make the most of it and to have a positive time. With that, we should do everything we can to be positive to others, but I believe that everyone should find a balance in their lives. Looking out for others, but keeping our beliefs to ourselves. I believe our commection to the planet and nature is crucial to our brief time here.

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  46. Section 10 TR 2:40
    Reality is the factual World in which we are all in. Life happens in reality and death also happens in it. It’s where we feel joy and pain.

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  47. 1/17/19
    PHIL 1030-006
    My personal philosophy is simple, "just go with the flow". I've always used this term since I was small, I'm sure I heard it on some movie or tv show and it just stuck. I feel that by simply "going with the flow" of things makes life simpler and easy; creating a stressless environment where life just does life and I'm along for the ride. I'm a big believer in fate, I think that stemmed from my early fascination with greek mythology and learning about the Fates (I was always watching Disney's Hercules). If it is Fate, then it will happen, and even if I alter my path, somehow what is going to happen will eventually always happen, it may just take a little longer.

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    1. Ruj Haan10:56 PM CDT

      That’s such a great philosophy to have. There are a lot of things that give use unnecessary headaches in our daily lives. Going with the flow sometimes brings opportunities that wouldn’t have come up other ways.

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  48. 1/21/19
    Phil 1030-006
    McKayla G
    Philosophy to me is your own way of living life. My personal philosophy is "don't think, just do". I go by this phrase because if I'm thinking about doing something and I think about it for too long I will most likely think myself out of doing it. So if i don't think and just do whatever it is, ill get it done. This could also be risky, but what is life without risks? I would rather just do whatever it is that I'm thinking about rather than think about what my life would have been like if I held back and not taken the risks.
    One of the philosophers that I a familiar with and like is Emerson. One quote from Emerson is, "Finish each day and be done with it", this is really where I got my philosophy of "don't think, just do" following what Emerson said by just getting the day done.

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  49. I am glad you take pride in what you write. This makes you stand way out from many other writers that push poorly written content.
    Box Μελισσες

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  50. 13
    Who is my favorite philosopher? Hands down, Joe Dirt. "Life's a garden, dig it."

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  51. 12
    I’d have to say my definition of philosophy comes down to the meaning of the word itself, philo-meaning love, sophos- meaning wisdom. Which I find hard to pin down because everyone for the most part has very different views and beliefs on the way life should be lived.

    To answer who is my favorite philosopher, although he is a psychology professor, has to be Jordan Peterson during his rise to popularity even though I read his 12 rules to life book long before he became somewhat famous. My personal beliefs and ideas about life and people often coincide with his, so it makes sense to me at least.

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  52. My favorite philosopher is Alan Watts solely for his "What do I desire" speech as his thought on this subject is very much the same to how I feel.

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  53. Open Question. Do you believe in ultimatums?

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  54. I feel like everyone has a right to their own facts and opinions. In general facts are just largely agreed upon opinions. For example everyone believed the world was flat and it was a fact but after research it was proved wrong and now the majority of people believe it is round. Now usually research and such is involved, but that could be incorrect. So do you believe it or not? What scientific discovery will come next and completely change how we view our world. It's really your choice and same goes for opinions however opinions are usually less serious or are just what your brain tells you and cannot control. Can someone be factually attractive. Why do we find some animals cute and others repulsive.

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    1. section 13
      I fully agree to your statement on everyone being entitled to their own opinion. Each person is different in their own way which in turn means no one thinks the same which gives way towards people having their own opinions.

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  55. Brian A Perez10:32 PM CDT

    "Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy of life?"

    To put it simply: work hard and be nice. There is this immense sensation of happiness and relief when I find that I have finished anything that I know I have given my all. Not only does it make me happy to know that I have completed an assigned task, but it gives me a sense of purpose and motivation to move on to what's next in life.
    For me, to be nice is to be as ethical and fair with others as possible (although those two seem to be contradicting at times).

    "Do you have a favorite philosopher?"

    Recently, I have taken a liking to the ideas of Immanuel Kant. Although I am religious and Kant's ideas go against pairing morality with religion, I still enjoy the idea that people can use reasoning through intellect in order to do what is right.
    Kant also had the right idea when it came to Liberty. He believed that we were only free when we acted in our best nature and were not free when we were under the rule of our own desires or of others.

    "A free will and a will under moral laws are one and the same" -Kant

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  56. Ruj Haan10:42 PM CDT

    Section 13
    What's your definition of "philosophy"?
    Although I don’t fully understand philosophy, but from my understanding philosophy is the study of wisdom. Its where we question the world around us, learn from people with different perspectives, and gain wisdom.
    Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy of life?
    One of my current philosophy of life is not to be afraid of failure. We live in a world where people are constantly trying to be perfect and even a small thought of failure frightens us. There have been many times in the past where I would not start a new project or a task because I was afraid of failure. I have learned over the years that success comes after failure. Instead of letting my failures become barriers, I have learned to effectively analyze them and use them as assets. “ Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” -Robert F. Kennedy

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  57. Seraphim Sherman8:40 AM CDT

    Section 13:
    What's your definition of philosophy? I have a very rudimentary understanding of philosophy, but I believe that philosophy is a sort of meta way of thinking or studying wisdom.
    Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy of life?
    My current philosophy on life is to work hard and achieve my ambitions. I believe that it is important for me to achieve my goals so that I can be successful in life.
    My favorite philosopher is probably Rene Descartes, but more for his mathematical teachings than his philosophical ones. I've had to learn a decent bit about him for my math classes throughout high school, but I haven't really had a chance to learn about his philosophical teachings. "Cogito ergo sum"

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  58. 12
    Open question: What does philosophy mean to you?

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  59. SECTION 12:
    My definition of philosophy is having a particular way that a person lives by, or follows as everyone lives in a different kind of way.
    The current philosophy I have is to do things and regret, rather than not doing something and regretting. By doing things, you learn from it and are able to experience rather than being curious as to what would happen if you WERE to do something.
    As for a favorite philosopher, I enjoyed reading and learning about
    Aristotle. "Happiness depends upon ourselves." I feel that is true, as many people have various definitions for what happiness is. What is happy to one person, may be the opposite to someone else. But it is good to be able to have such happiness.

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  60. Daniel Dupuy11:51 AM CDT

    Section 12/DSB 101
    My definition of philosophy is the factual evidence of human thought about life itself, and how it changed, now is and is changing ; the knowledge we had throughout time changed- from cavemen to kings- and it is changing- for example, the advancement of technology and its effects on human existence.

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    1. I know everyone will quote a famous Philosopher, but i will add the link of my favorite music album that in some way relates to current human thought; by the name, "How to be a Human Being", you can tell that it has its own philosophical thought of human life, and HOW TO BE A HUMAN BEING!

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExvqA9I_gsQ&list=PLCv_4vjZ47aS4FwARRs3kp7Ir4wy4MWsm

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  61. Seraphim Sherman4:02 PM CDT

    Section 13
    I think this is a relevant video. This channel has a large amount of philosophical and existential videos, and this is, in my opinion, one of the better ones. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psaCM1j9LEM

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  62. Section 12

    My philosophy in life is one that I think about quite frequently. I want to understand the world as it actually is, rather than how I wish it would be. This can be difficult, of course, because there will always be mysteries in our world, our universe, and even ourselves. Even so, I strive to be as accurate as possible in spite of my natural, human limitations. To accomplish this, I believe in taking on new challenges and experiences so that I can see and interact with the world first-hand. I want to be open minded as new information is presented to me (which happens every day), so that I can learn, adapt, and grow. I don't see an end to information gathering, but rather a rewarding journey of self discovery.

    I don't have a favorite philosopher picked out, but I really like William James's philosophical approach in our assigned reading. I would like to learn more about his ideas.

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  63. Section 13
    David Rizkalla
    The definition of philosophy for me is the set of beliefs that someone uses in a daily basis, also having clarity in knowledge.I have one main philosophy that I always follow no matter what. If things don't go according to plan that doesn't mean that the plan failed you just need to adapt/improvise. I don't have a favorite philosopher just yet since I'm yet to look into each philosopher's work/ideas. Socrates peaked my interest, considering he is the father of western philosophy and also taught many major figures in philosophy.

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  64. Section 13
    David Rizkalla
    My definition of reality is a bit pessimistic and a bit optimistic. I believe that in any realistic life, things won't really go smoothly there may be some detours. The ability to bounce back from this is what changes situations drastically. My view on how reality is ties very well with my philosophy in life.

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  65. Section 11
    Antonious Hana
    definition of philosophy is Philosophy is a Greek word composed of two parts "Philo," meaning "love," and "Sofia," meaning "wisdom," meaning, in Greek origin, "love of wisdom" and not possess.

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  66. Logan Taylor10:33 PM CDT

    Section 11

    Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy of life?

    My personal philosophy stems from two different ideologies. "Don't try to fix things that can't be helped, but do try and fix things that can be helped." Sometimes, life gets you down, whether it be a failing grade on a test or a death in the family. But, I choose to look at some things in life as inevitable and simply move on from them. Bad things happen to different people all the time; it's just a part of being alive. This philosophy allows me to focus on the things that I can improve about myself and others. The other part of my personal philosophy is to "live for the present". I mean, if we get so tripped up about what the future will be like, we will stay worried all the time. No one knows what the future holds, so live in this point in time.

    Alternative Quiz Question: What is the mental operating phrase that you lived by if you were certain that you possess the "real truth"?

    What is your definition of "philosophy"?

    My definition of philosophy was originally the search for knowledge and the overall concepts that make up the Universe.

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  67. Section 11
    Philosophy is different for everyone, and mine especially is constantly changing. I believe there are no hard and fast rules, and the best way to approach knowledge is with the mentality of someone who knows nothing.

    I read educated in two days, only putting the book down once. I thought it was a work of art. I stayed until the end of convocation to talk with Tara Westover one-on-one and even went as far as to purchase some of her mothers essential oils. It really helped show a more technical view of where students priorities should lie. Her story was well written, inspiring, and eye opening. I found myself frequently having to remind myself that it was a memoir. The events are really taking place, the issues are real issues people are facing. The book was incredible. If you haven't read it, I highly recommend you do.

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  68. Anonymous11:48 AM CDT

    Philosophy to me is a way of studying human thinking and human wisdom. It is a study of the love of wisdom.

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  69. Section 11

    I personally have yet to find a favorite philosopher so hopefully taking this class will help me discover one. Also my definition for philosophy is really just something that can have many answers. It’s a subject in which it stretches your brain and really makes you think, why this and why that. But as you think you get many answers to it. I don’t think there’s exactly one true definition to philosophy because it is so abstract.

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  70. Anonymous12:39 AM CDT

    intelligence squared is a very interesting podcast you can find online if anyone is looking for something to think about.

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  71. Cameron Ghalami
    section 12:
    More stuff on virtue.

    https://youtu.be/w0qCC4FHYM0

    https://youtu.be/-oJs5u_GAYA

    https://youtu.be/csIW4W_DYX4

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