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Monday, September 9, 2019

Music, film, & philosophy

Country Music as Melting Pot
The new documentary series by Ken Burns aims to remind divided Americans of what they have in common.
By Margaret Renkl

NASHVILLE — Last spring at the Ryman Auditorium, sitting in the audience for a concert filmed to celebrate the new documentary series by Ken Burns, I couldn’t help but notice that the folks around me didn’t look much like the usual bro-country fans swarming Nashville these days. Just who exactly was this documentary aiming to reach?

All of us, it turns out. People of every age, every political persuasion, every socio-economic class, every race. The goal of “Country Music” is nothing less than to remind us of who we really are. Even its cover image is designed to evoke the American flag.

Country music, Mr. Burns explained at the concert, is “a uniquely American art form,” one whose signature instruments, the banjo and the fiddle, continue to transmit the disparate cultures, African and European, from which the music sprang. “Country music has never been one style of music,” Mr. Burns said. “It has always been a mixture of many styles, springing from many roots and sprouting many new branches to create a complicated chorus of American voices joining together to tell a complicated American story. (continues)
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13 comments:

  1. Country has always been apart my culture do to the fact of where I was raised. Its changed over the years from being real country, to todays country. Its a way of life for some but that is explained through the music.

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    1. Section 11
      Same here, real country has turned into today's country for the most part. Yet, there are still some wholesome country artist in the midst of the "no good" ones.

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    2. Andy Miles Section 11 I find it difficult to seek out good modern country and thus have given up partly on the genre unless others have suggestions to which i will happily give it a try! On the whole bringing people together I am eager to see what Ken Burns means.

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  2. A genre of music (or even music itself) is just one of many examples of how something so simple can create extremely relatable interactions. It's a fuzzy feeling when you get to take part in a discussion or experience that's void of any exterior judgement. Everybody who's taking part is there for the same reason. To gain a level of happiness, growth, or simply stepping out of one's daily strides can heavily contribute to forming strong relationships and memories. It's a great thing, really.

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  3. The Old Town Roads phenomenon really shows how a different style of country music can become extremely popular with everyone no matter who they are.

    - Cody Maness Section 11

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    1. I completely agree, to me Old Town Road was a surprisingly popular song for our generation. This does demonstrate different styles of country music.

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  4. I really enjoyed reading this post. This is so true that country music is always gonna be your roots, no matter how much you may hate it. For me personally, I am not the biggest country music fanatic but whenever I hear it, I just want to laugh because it reminds me of my roots.
    Section 11

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  5. I used to not like country, because of the current trends in it, but when I started listening to older stuff I really began to enjoy it.

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  6. Grayson Holley1:07 AM CDT

    Section 13
    If you are from the south, mostly everyone has a soft spot for country music even if you can't admit it. Many of my friends say they can't stand to listen to country music but love Kacey Musgraves!

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    Replies
    1. Andy Miles Section 11 I will have to give her a listen, i have a soft spot for folk and bluegrass but country is a much more difficult genre for me.

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  7. Anonymous9:22 AM CDT

    I love country music, there are songs about all different kinds of topics but the main thing that people sing about is being respectful and doing good in life. There are songs about certain states that expresses the culture of that state. There are songs about men and women in the military. There are songs about peoples kids growing up. It is easier for some people, including me to relate to country music.

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