Up@dawn 2.0

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Section 8: Kevin Casillas: Installment 1 – Game of Thrones


For this 1st installment, I have decided to write about Game of Thrones and its philosophy. In the TV show, there are seven kingdoms, and are ruled by one king. The seven kingdoms each have their own Lord, or someone in charge that controls the city. Most of these people have their own philosophy on how to manage a city. They also have their beliefs, religions, and philosophies that are quite different from each other. We have several philosophies, for example, the Tywin Lannister’s philosophy, Daenerys Targaryen’s philosophy, and Ned & Robbs Stark’s philosophy.
            Tywin Lannister’s philosophy is probably the more gruesome philosophy in my opinion. Tywin believes controlling and maintaining power is the happiness of life. He does it so he can carry out his cause, belief, and to have legacy to leave behind for the rest of the world to see. A great comparison to Tywin would be Niccolo Machiavelli. “Machiavelli is most well-known for his writing of The Prince, and what has become known as “Machiavellianism”, which refers to being duplicitous or deceitful to get ahead.” Another thing Tywin is known for is the ability to plan his moves, and always be one step ahead of the enemy. But he is not always brutal, and violent for every circumstance he comes across. He’s brutal the situation calls for it, or when it is necessary. “He once remarks to Joffrey, “When your enemies defy you, you must serve them steel and fire. When they go to their knees, however, you must help them back to their feet. Elsewise no man will ever bend the knee to you.” This exemplifies Tywin, and his willingness to be brutal, but not blindly so. He plans and plots, he’s duplicitous, and he’s clearly out for his own best interests first and foremost.”
            Daenerys Targaryen’s philosophy is the savior. In the show, she free slaves, cares for other people, and puts the greater good above herself. She is merciful, but at the same time if you ever did cross her she would punish you without hesitation. People described her as the breaker of chains since she would free many people as she can. In one season, she decided to free a city of slaves who were owned by rich people. So, asked them to release them in exchange for something, but they refused to do so. Daenerys then attacked them and freed the slaves. In the end, she is the breaker of chains, and cares about other people.
            Ned and Rob’s philosophy are the opposite of Tywin Lannister. They have honor, and respect for everyone. Ned and Rob are more based on “moral absolutism. “Virtue, as described by Aristotle throughout his Nicomachean Ethics, is about voluntary and habitual actions and self-training, both intellectually and morally. You knowingly and willingly act with your highest character, for the sake of it and not for reward, and this is key–you do it even despite consequences.” In the show Ned believes in slaughtering everyone who is an enemy of the crown. He believes in justice, and a trial for everyone. He does the right things even knowing it could harm him or even kill him.

            We can see in Game of Thrones no one is safe, whether it be yourself, belief, or honor.  We have these powerful people fighting what they believe, whether it costs your life, humanity, or your pride. I want to leave a couple questions for you. Which philosophy do you associate more? Do you believe we have similar philosophies in the modern world?

2 comments:

  1. "you do it even despite consequences" - so maybe you'll want to bring Kant into the conversation in your next post?

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  2. Devin Willis4:25 PM CDT

    Daenerys Targaryen’s philosophy is admirable, I'm glad to hear about her triumphs in freeing the slaves. It's common for people not to react on the brutalities slaves endure, but to see her taking matters into her own hands is remarkable.

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