Up@dawn 2.0

Saturday, November 12, 2016

Quiz Nov 14/15

1. In what three ways do we most often fail to know ourselves, according to Plato/Socrates?

2. What antisocial conclusion is embodied by Thrasymachus and Callicles?

3. Who does Goldstein describe as a composite of JFK, Trump, Petraeus, Muhammad Ali, Julian Assange and others?

4. What 19th century philosophical classic was anticipated by Alcibiades?

5. How does "the glory that was Greece" challenge our core values?

6. What's a daimon?

7. What state or attitude does Plato consider paradigmatically philosophical?

8. What's the characteristic delusion of interpersonal love, according to Plato?

9. When and why does Plato say people should be content in relationships with those they find less physically attractive than others?

10. What does Plato find confusing about modern "Platonic love"?


DQ

  • Do you think you have an accurate understanding of your own attractiveness, virtue, and wisdom? Is such knowledge best acquired by introspection, interaction with others, or what?
  • Do you admire people who pride themselves in doing whatever they can get away with, and think evading or breaking social rules and expectations makes them smart?
  • Would you want to live the life of an Alcibiades? Does he appear to fit the profile of someone suffering NPD or some other clinical deficiency? Does our culture think too highly of self-absorbed charismatic people?
  • "...in such a way was the fate of Athens determined by one man's drive to make himself the focus of everyone's attention, his name on everyone's lips" - remind you of anyone, at least with regard to personal ambition for public notoriety? 238
  • Do you think our changing views on sexual morality have brought us closer to the Greeks? In a good way? 242
  • Is it dangerous or undemocratic to believe in the existence of people who are intermediate between mortals and gods?
  • Is there something wrong with people who aren't "transformed" by love? 256
  • Is impersonal love of "the True-the Beautiful-the Good" higher and better than love of & for another person, and than self-love?
  • Is it ever appropriate for students and teachers to become emotionally and /or sexually involved? 264
  • Is it ever acceptable to enter (unilaterally) into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage? 266
  • Is "Eye Rampantly Roving" inappropriately self-indulgent, to flirt with other men even though she says she loves her husband? 271
  • Would you ever marry someone you found physically unattractive? 
  • How would you have answered any of the letters from the lovelorn differently than Margo and Plato did?

117 comments:

  1. (H3) getting away with it? I think we all have that small modicum of reluctant respect for those with the gall to try and do anything they think they have a shot at getting away with. On the whole though I would regard them as, to put it bluntly, as a foolish people running their luck down until one day they get themselves, arrested, conned, become the subject of bodily harm, or befall some ill that i the result of their recklessness. As Qui-Gon Jin said, "There's always a bigger fish."

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    1. You forget the exceptions. Just because these people break social rules and expectations does not always mean they are doing something criminal, sometimes it is just something different from the social norm that they are doing.

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    2. H1
      I think that people always admire strong character qualities in others. We admire strength, bravery, self-confidence, beauty, talent. Of course, these qualities can be used for both good and bad things. When someone like Alcibiades did horrible things, people were disturbed by his actions, but could not help from admiring the qualities that it took to do them.

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  2. (H3) Or what? Wisdom is best judged by others, especially if they deem you wise and you don't see it. Virtue is best deemed by one's self for others cannot tell true virtue from selfish virtue. Beauty is best judged by others, who are also the worst judges because of the illusory standards of the modern world.

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  3. (h3)Alcibiades? I would say we afford to much recognition to so called "Alcibiades" like characters. The majority of people do not admire them so much as they admire the idea they represent. Success, fortune, fame, material happiness basically.

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  4. (H3) really? well, he decided to make a DQ targeted at generating political/philosophical discussion over Donald Trumps election to the presidency. Didn't expect that.

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  5. (H3) Closer to the greeks? No, if I may paraphrase one of my other professors their reasons wee "to promote manhood and undermine womanhood." Because they basically render female into breeding cattle that are good for some simple pleasure and reproduction only. Modern stances positive of homosexuality arise from a desire for equality, this does not.

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  6. (H3) daimon? Yes, obviously because this opens the doors to a type of unbridled authority that is not only dangerous for the obvious danger that comes with concentrating all power at the top. But because it does undermine the core point of democracy, government by the people.

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  7. (H3) I guess I do admire people a little who pride themselves in doing whatever they can get away with and break social rules and expectations. It's not that I think they're more intelligent than everyone else it's just they have more guts to stand out in a crowd, self confidence to speak their minds. These are usually the same people who would choose a short, but extraordinary life. They are also the ones we read about in books and watch in moves: the rebels, outcasts, revolutionaries, vigilanties, underdogs, etc.

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  8. (H3) "In such a way was the fate of Athens determined by one man's drive to make himself the focus of everyone's attention, his name on everyone's lips." I can't help but think of Trump, our new president, when I read this statement. Instead of Athens, however, the fate of the United States, and the world hang in the balance. There are many in this modern era that fit this description other than him though.

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  9. (H3) I don't think it matters whether our sexual morality has become more similar to the Greeks. I think our viewpoints have definitely changed drastically over the last decade. People are starting to become more tolerant and understanding, I hope. Many are also becoming more comfortable with expressing who they are and what they want. They are able to be open about who they are and that is definitely a good thing.

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  10. (H3) I don't know if there's anything wrong with not being transformed by love. It's a romantic notion to believe that love can change a person, make them better, stronger. At the same time, though, do you really want love to change a person. Isn't being in love about accepting someone for who they are, not changing them but accepting them for who they are. It is great if a relationship teaches you something, but if not, that's not so bad either.

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  11. (H3) I remember the conversation about the appropriateness of students and teachers become emotionally or sexually involved came up during the free speech panel last month. I can definitely see where lines can become crossed in this kind of situation. In college, the argument can be made that they are both consenting adults and that there is no problem. However, I think it would be a distraction to say the least.

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  12. (H3) It definitely doesn't sound pleasant to enter into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage. However, arranged marriages are still common in many countries today. They are based on financial or social statuses more than on love and passion. Statistically, these marriages last longer than ones based on love and emotion because they are, for lack of a better word, logically-based. Whether it is an acceptable relationship or not is based on what each person in the relationship needs or is wanting to get out of the relationship.

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  13. (h3) Transformed? No, love doesn't have to be transformative, especially if you consider the full gauntlet of what love is. love can be plutocratic, in which case that does not transform you just attaches you to another individual.

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  14. (H3) Unilaterally? Yes and no, if you do so with the purpose to deceive, than no, however arranged marriages have been practiced, and still are practiced, for many reasons and although I do not agree with it. I'm going to be more open minded by saying that these are acceptable reasons to some.

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  15. (H3) Unattractive? To a degree yes. I know it will sound a little selfish of me to say I will not marry someone I consider ugly, but someone I consider plain or not unattractive yes I would because then the physical does not distract from the spiritual beauty.

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  16. (H3) While there are many aspects of a person that are more important than physical apperance, being attracted to someone physically is important. People say it is shallow to judge someone based on their appearance; I would agree if that was the only trait considered. A person is more than one trait. If you are lucky you might meet somone with multiple desirable traits but in the end you have to consider the whole package. I wouldn't marry someone I wasn't attracted to but my decision would be based on more than physical appearance. When you care about someone, I believe there flaws become just as attractive as their strengths.

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  17. (H3) Would you ever marry someone you found physically unattractive?
    No, but I wouldn't marry someone with an unattractive personality either.

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  18. (H3) Is it ever acceptable to enter (unilaterally) into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage?
    No, that is the fastest way to a divorce/break up. It's less about it being passionless than it not be consensual. Both partners should be on the same page in that way.

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  19. (H3) Is "Eye Rampantly Roving" inappropriately self-indulgent, to flirt with other men even though she says she loves her husband?
    No, in my opinion she's just admiring other people. If she really loves her husband then she won't have any internal worries about cheating on her husband. There's nothing wrong with harmless flirting even when in a relationship.

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  20. (H3) Is it ever appropriate for students and teachers to become emotionally and /or sexually involved?
    By professional and social reasoning, no it is never appropriate. But if they are two consenting adults then it's none of my business.

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  21. (H3) Do you think you have an accurate understanding of your own attractiveness, virtue, and wisdom? Is such knowledge best acquired by introspection, interaction with others, or what?
    I think I do. It is acquired first by interaction, then introspection.

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  22. (H3) Do you admire people who pride themselves in doing whatever they can get away with, and think evading or breaking social rules and expectations makes them smart?
    No I do not, more often than not they're just pretentious.

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  23. (H3) I think I have a good understanding of myself and my attractiveness and virtues.

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  24. Do you admire people who pride themselves in doing whatever they can get away with, and think evading or breaking social rules and expectations makes them smart?

    In a word, no. In two words: definitely not. Okay sure it makes them smart, but I do not admire misuse of intelligence.

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    Replies
    1. Does the fact that these people are breaking social rules and expectations mean they are misusing intelligence? What about their cunning, resourcefulness, and courage to break social rules. Do you admire those qualities about those people?

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  25. Do you think our changing views on sexual morality have brought us closer to the Greeks? In a good way? 242

    Yes, it's funny that our progressiveness is essentially regressiveness. We're moving backwards. I'm skeptical as to the supposed positive benefits.

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    1. How do you feel we are moving backwards?

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    2. I was referring to the accepting of homosexual behavior by our current society. If the ancient Greeks accepted it, than we should take a lot less credit for supposed "enlightenment." I think anything we take from a culture with such drastically different goals and values as our own needs to be carefully weighed to see if it reflects our own desires for humanity. I am personally against the practice of homosexuality, but I am not necessarily against all legislation that supports it. Such legislation reflects our "live and let live" values, and ideas of personal freedom. Sure we could make it illegal, but people would still practice it, and I don't want to send an otherwise productive member of society to jail over consensual homosexual acts.

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  26. Is it ever appropriate for students and teachers to become emotionally and /or sexually involved?

    No, absolutely never appropriate as long as the student teacher relationship is upheld.

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  27. Is it dangerous or undemocratic to believe in the existence of people who are intermediate between mortals and gods?

    Highly dangerous to elevate any man or woman to any such status. I say it is unfortunately very democratic though. People long for a strong leader, and often thrust superhuman status on leaders they approve of.

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  28. Would you ever marry someone you found physically unattractive?

    I find nothing wrong with the proposition philosophically, but realistically, I think doing so would endanger the entire marriage, and open doors to heartbreak for both of us.

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  29. Is it ever acceptable to enter (unilaterally) into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage?

    Echoing what I just said, sure it's acceptable, but it's a very bad idea.

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  30. Is it ever acceptable to enter (unilaterally) into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage?

    Echoing what I just said, sure it's acceptable, but it's a very bad idea.

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  31. Personally, I do admire those who pride themselves on doing whatever they can get away with. They show their cunning and resourcefulness this way and those are two traits that I highly admire. On the other hand, I don't admire what they do if they choose to use those traits for unjustifiable criminal acts.

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  32. I do think our changing views on sexual morality is bringing us closer to the Greek concept and that it is actually a good thing for the most part. The Greeks were tolerant on any sexuality and to a certain degree, I think our society should be too. The only line I would draw on sexual morality is pedophilia because I 100% believe that is wrong and should not be allowed.

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  33. In my opinion, I believe there is only one time period that anyone, not just teachers and students, should become emotionally or sexually involved and that time is when they truly have feelings for each other that they believe will last into a well formed relationship.

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  34. I do not think it is ever acceptable to deliberately enter into a passionless relationship because that is cruel to the other person and the relationship can only ever end badly.

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  35. Would I ever marry someone who I found physically unattractive? Most likely, no because if I am repulsed by them enough to not even want to talk to them I would never marry them, but if it was just a matter of them not being the most attractive person in the world or nearby and they had a great soul then yes, I would marry them without a second thought.

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  36. "...in such a way was the fate of Athens determined by one man's drive to make himself the focus of everyone's attention, his name on everyone's lips" - remind you of anyone, at least with regard to personal ambition for public notoriety?
    Though I am sure it has been said before, my answer is Trump. He became a candidate and made it to the presidency from just the fact that he was the one that stood out, he was the one everyone remembered and stayed on everyone's lips. Everyone talked about him and he was all over the internet. This notoriety is what made him the president and it in a way leaves this nations fate in his hands.

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  37. (H3) I don't admire people who attempt to get away with whatever they can. I don't think it's smart, I just find it deceptive and cowardly.

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    1. You can't exactly call it cowardly because does it not take some form of courage to break social rules and expectations, especially if these rules and expectations are wrong?

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  38. (H3) Our culture definitely views people in too positive of a light who think highly of themselves. There is a fine line between being confident and being cocky and self absorbed.

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  39. (H3) In recent light, someone wanting to be known by everyone seems to be Donald Trump. He wants the entire world to know who he is and unfortunately he may get his wish.

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  40. (H3) Our views today seem closer to the the Greeks views on sexuality morality. I would consider it a good thing in some aspects.

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  41. (H3) I find it dangerous to believe there are people who are in between being mortal and a god because all of us are mortal except the one true God.

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  42. (H3) I think you grow in love with someone but being transformed may not always happen. The person you're with should bring the best out of you but a transformation is typically something drastic.

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  43. (H3) I don't find it appropriate for students and teachers to be emotionally/sexually connected. That crosses a boundary that could cause issues to arise.

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    1. Even if they're not in the same classroom? Where's the harm there?

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  44. (H3) I definitely think it's wrong to enter into a passionless marriage. There is a high high chance that it will end in divorce and you're just setting yourself up for failure. You should be extremely passionate about the person you choose to spend your life with.

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  45. (H3) Physical attractive obviously isn't everything but you do have to be attracted to someone in order to be in a romantic relationship with them. I don't think I could marry someone who I wasn't attracted to.

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  46. Christian Brooks (H3)12:36 PM CST

    “Do you think you have an accurate understanding of your own attractiveness, virtue, and wisdom? Is such knowledge best acquired by introspection, interaction with others, or what?”
    I believe I commonly overestimate all of those attributes for myself. I am a bit narcissistic, and I often judge my potential rather than my common state. I believe I have most often encountered the reality from the observations and actions of others, rather than extended self-assessment.

    “Do you admire people who pride themselves in doing whatever they can get away with, and think evading or breaking social rules and expectations makes them smart?”
    I am actually often annoyed by those who try to do whatever they feel like with minimal backlash. While breaking expectations may make them seem clever, I know it is mostly luck. Part of me feels the annoyance due to jealousy (since I could never get away with it), but I also appreciate the security of living within the rules when appropriate.

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  47. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  48. Do you admire people who pride themselves in doing whatever they can get away with, and think evading or breaking social rules and expectations makes them smart? No, I think those who have a strong moral value and stick to it, or repent when they say from it, are smart and live the most virtuous life. H3

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    1. So you don't admire Martin Luther King Jr.?

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    2. What if the rules themselves are wrong? Who decides that? I would say God does.

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    3. What if the rules themselves are wrong? Who decides that? I would say God does.

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  49. Would you want to live the life of an Alcibiades? Does he appear to fit the profile of someone suffering NPD or some other clinical deficiency? Does our culture think too highly of self-absorbed charismatic people? No, I would not like to live a life like Alcbiades. I want to love and be changed by love. I want love to be deeper than mere attraction and admiration-- it should lead to action. I think our society thinks too highly of self-absorbed people because half of our society voted for a reality tv star as president. H3

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  50. Is it ever acceptable to enter (unilaterally) into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage? I don't think that marriage is meant to be passionless or loveless. Marriage is meant to be a unity that makes both parties better and happier. I think there are some circumstances in which it is necessary though, like the marriage of royalty to stop war. H3

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  51. Would you ever marry someone you found physically unattractive?
    I think physical attractiveness is important for a healthy relationship, but if I loved the person deeply, I would certainly not let physical attributes stop me from spending my life with the person. H3

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    1. Just a question... if you love them so deeply, wouldn't they become physically attractive to you?

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  52. Is it ever appropriate for students and teachers to become emotionally and /or sexually involved?
    I think that love is love, but it is definitely easier to use a position of power for abuse-- which is never okay. H3

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    1. So it's okay as long as there is no abuse?

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  53. Is there something wrong with people who aren't "transformed" by love?
    I think it is human nature to change, to be transformed by things, especially love. There are those that can't feel love necessarily or be changed by it, like sociopaths. H3

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    1. I don't think you can say their sociopaths and can't feel love just because they weren't transformed by it, they just know who they are and what they want.

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  54. Would you ever marry someone you found physically unattractive?
    I don't think I would ever test out my love in the first place with someone I found unattractive, but if it so happened to end up that way, I would certainly not let my standards on looks dictate the value of my love.
    (H2)

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    1. If you love them wouldn't they become attractive to you, so then your standards on looks would change?

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  55. Is it ever acceptable to enter (unilaterally) into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage?

    Echoing what I just said, sure it's acceptable, but it's a very bad idea.

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    1. If something is acceptable shouldn't also be a good idea?

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  56. (H3) Do you think you have an accurate understanding of your own attractiveness, virtue, and wisdom? Is such knowledge best acquired by introspection, interaction with others, or what?

    Probably not in some cases. I have the tendency to undermine myself on such things with the belief that it is better to underestimate rather than overestimate. For these three I think that the knowledge is best acquired through honest introspection. Then again, they could just be considered an opinion since what someone would consider wise, virtuous, or attractive are at least somewhat subjective.

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  57. (H3) Do you admire people who pride themselves in doing whatever they can get away with, and think evading or breaking social rules and expectations makes them smart?

    No I do not, nor do I think they are smart for doing something that breaks society's rules (because I think that the two do not correlate; you can be smart and not try to "get away with things" and vice versa). If they have some particularly ingenious or creative plan in order to get away with something, I might respect or even admire that in of itself but that would be as far as the admiration goes.

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  58. (H3) Is there something wrong with people who aren't "transformed" by love? 256

    I don't think so. Love doesn't always have to be about changing a person- I'd even say that love should generally never be about changing a person. There are always instances where love changes someone, for the better or worse, but just because you don't go through some transformation when you love someone doesn't mean something is wrong with you.

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  59. (H3) Is it ever appropriate for students and teachers to become emotionally and /or sexually involved? 264

    I would say no, since there would always be a power dynamic. Even if the parties in question agreed to keep it separate from their "working relationship" that dynamic would always be there. I also agree with Margo in saying that there would be no way to know for sure that neither of the two would become emotionally invested in the relationship. As an aside, I asked my mom if she had any philosophical thoughts about this and while she pretty much agreed with everything I said (while throwing some psychology in there too) she recommended listening to The Police song "Don't Stand so Close to Me" to get her "philosophical opinion" on it.

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  60. Is impersonal love of "the True-the Beautiful-the Good" higher and better than love of & for another person, and than self-love?

    I believe that the love of simple beauty creates a state in man nearly unreachable by any other philosophical dogma. This love leads one to appreciate every second he spends on this Earth, as there is a touch of beauty in truly everything if you look hard enough. The love of an individual elicits a similar feeling, but the feeling, same as the love, is short lived, and eventually, inevitably leads to sadness. The simple, impersonal, love of all things is a foundation towards pushing for the greater good of all, thus making it a better, more virtuous love.

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  61. In a way believing in the existence of people who are intermediate between mortals and gods could be dangerous just because you could be easily influenced by them and no longer have a mind of your own.

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  62. I would never marry anyone I found physically unattractive, while their personality may be great that's not what I'm waking up to every morning...

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  63. I don't think it's appropriate for a student and professor to have an emotional/sexual relationship, unless they are not in the same classroom (that professor doesn't teach that student), then by all means do as you wish.

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  64. I don’t think it’s ever acceptable to enter into a deliberately passionless relationship/marriage because someone is going to get hurt in the end.

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  65. (H1) Is "Eye Rampantly Roving" inappropriately self-indulgent, to flirt with other men even though she says she loves her husband?

    While I think it is normal for you to be attracted to other people and find others attractive even while you are in a relationship, it is inappropriate for you to act on these things. One should not encourage this kind of attention towards themselves or flirt with others while in a relationship, especially if they claim they love their partner. It is completely unfair to the partner in this respect and you don't really love them if you do this.

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  66. (H1) Do you think you have an accurate understanding of your own attractiveness, virtue, and wisdom? Is such knowledge best acquired by introspection, interaction with others, or what?

    I think for everyone their own understanding of these things is skewed. We are more likely to judge ourselves more harshly than those close to us would and we are more likely to compare our own traits to those of others. Outside perspective is needed in this case to help balance one's own skewed ideas out.

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  67. (H1) Is there something wrong with people who aren't "transformed" by love?

    I don't think there's anything wrong with it, per say, but I do believe that one's partner and oneself are bound together through this partnership and thus grow together and make each other better. This is an ideal, anyway, and each relationship is different and different things work for different people, so this might not be the case for some.

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    1. H1
      I agree that partner's bind to each other, and should grow to make each other better. I disagree though, by thinking that a person should be transformed by love. Being in love means, for the first time, that your thoughts are focused more on that other person than on yourself; that changes priorities and helps make a person less selfish. If that doesn't happen, then I don't think it's real love.

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  68. (H1) Would you ever marry someone you found physically unattractive?

    I think that by the point I got to wanting to marry them I should find them physically attractive, even if I didn't do so in the beginning. As is stated in the book, the beauty of the soul is more important but this tends to compound on one's physical beauty to make them appear even more attractive. If I can't find myself attracted to my partner, I would reassess my own thinking and our relationship.

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  69. (H1) Is it ever appropriate for students and teachers to become emotionally and /or sexually involved?

    I think that emotionally, great friendships can be born between teaches and students but any type of relationship other than that is best held off on until the student is no longer underneath that teacher. These types of relationships can make things muddled and distract from the student's learning.

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    1. H1
      I agree! I know friendships between teachers and students can be momental, helping the student learn and challenge themselves, and it can give them a mentor who can bond with them.

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  70. I think that people who go against social rules for the better are very admirable because they aren’t afraid of what people will say and they are very brave.

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  71. I don’t think I have an accurate understanding of my own attractiveness, virtue and wisdom because I tend to be my worst enemy and see flaws others don’t.

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  72. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with people who aren’t “transformed” by love, they are just very solid or stubborn in their ways and know exactly who they are and what they want.

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  73. H1
    DQ: •Would you ever marry someone you found physically unattractive?
    Luckily for me, the man I'm engaged to is attractive, so I don't have to consider this choice as a real one I'll ever have to make. This is a difficult question. We should love our significant other, and the love can't be based on their appearance. We should love them for who they are, and appearance can be changed so easily: lifestyle change, health problems, accidents. Our relationship with our spouse should be based on who they are. But at the same time, if we are making the choice of who we are to be living with for the rest of our lives, we should make sure that they are someone we know we would enjoy being physically intimate with; if you aren't attracted to your spouse, then you won't be able to fulfill each other in that regard very well.

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  74. H1
    DQ: •Is "Eye Rampantly Roving" inappropriately self-indulgent, to flirt with other men even though she says she loves her husband?
    Yes she is. She may think that she loves her husband, but if she is seriously entertaining thoughts to cheat on him, her selfishness is much larger than her love for him. She married him, which means she promised to stay faithful to him. She made that decision, and she should have the integrity to stick to it.

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  75. H1
    DQ:•Is it ever appropriate for students and teachers to become emotionally and /or sexually involved?
    I think that's always wrong when the student is taking a class with that professor; there's no way for the professor to grade fairly. I'm sure that students and professors in the same school have had meaningful relationships, but I think it's better when they don't share the same classroom.

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  76. H1
    DQ: •Is it ever acceptable to enter (unilaterally) into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage?
    I think that a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage is a sad thing, but I do know cases where those have been prompted by necessity; in the old American west, many times men and women married to help survival, or to take care of small children than couldn't be watched by their widowed fathers. To do this to serve a greater good is admirable, but I can't consider it desirable.

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  77. H1
    DQ: •Is it dangerous or undemocratic to believe in the existence of people who are intermediate between mortals and gods?
    I think it is dangerous; idealizing any person, forgetting that they are human, and so necessarily flawed, leads to despotism, and fanatical followings of politicians or celebrities. People should never worship other people; it only leads downhill.

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  78. H1
    DQ:•Do you think you have an accurate understanding of your own attractiveness, virtue, and wisdom? Is such knowledge best acquired by introspection, interaction with others, or what?
    I think it will take a lifetime to accurately understand myself. I think that understanding is acquired by a combination of introspection, interaction with others, and a constant education of the mind. They give each other balance and perspective.

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  79. (H3) Is it ever acceptable to enter (unilaterally) into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage? 266
    I would say that it's not. To do that to someone, especially I they don't know they are about to enter into a passionless relationship, is unacceptable and pretty pointless in my opinion. Why would you even enter into such a relationship willingly if you feel such a way?

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  80. Would you ever marry someone you found physically unattractive?
    I suppose I would, if I really loved them. I've always prized other things over physical appearance, especially a sense of humor. There are things much more important that looks in this world, and if I found someone who made me truly happy I don't think I would be willing to marry them.

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  81. Do you admire people who pride themselves in doing whatever they can get away with, and think evading or breaking social rules and expectations makes them smart?

    I do not admire people like this. I place a high value on integrity. Getting away with doing wrong just because no one is watching show absolutely no integrity and a lack of morals in my opinion. If you have to have someone judging you to do what is right than you lack a necessary skill in my opinion. (H1)

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  82. Do you think our changing views on sexual morality have brought us closer to the Greeks? In a good way?

    I do think these changing views are a good thing. I believe wholly in human rights and freedom of religion. Both of these support an individuals right to love whomever they want. I am glad that (at least for now) our country has made it to a place where they stop allowing some people's religions to prevent others from expressing their constitutional rights as well.

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  83. Is it ever appropriate for students and teachers to become emotionally and /or sexually involved? 264

    I do not feel that teachers should engage in relationships with current students. The teacher is in a position of power which can have a severe impact on the intentions and will of a student to participate in such relationship. If, a year or two after the student has left the teachers class, the feelings still exist, then the relationship begins outside of an imbalance of power.

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  84. DQ: Do you think you have an accurate understanding of your own attractiveness, virtue, and wisdom? Is such knowledge best acquired by introspection, interaction with others, or what?
    Answer: Attractiveness- Definitely not, but it’s one of those instances that I am okay with lowered expectations. Virtue and Wisdom- as a cynic of not only government and other people, but also myself, I can’t properly say. These are best acquired through personal experiences, revelations, and acceptance.

    DQ: Do you admire people who pride themselves in doing whatever they can get away with, and think evading or breaking social rules and expectations makes them smart?
    Answer: I admire their ability to do so, and their self-confidence more than anything. However, I don’t necessarily appreciate it as a statement alone- but rather for personal needs, and not ‘just because you can.” There needs to be a personal investment.

    DQ: Do you think our changing views on sexual morality have brought us closer to the Greeks? In a good way? 242
    Answer: I think that the view of sex and sexuality has been too much of a statement, and not for actual improvement. I agree with the changes for the better, mostly because I want those who it actually effects to be happy and feel confident and safe. However, I don’t think they currently do, and that is my issue.

    DQ: Is it dangerous or undemocratic to believe in the existence of people who are intermediate between mortals and gods?
    Answer: Undemocratic I can’t speak on, due to the fact that I can’t properly claim a political party. As for dangerous, I would only see a situation that calls for that in the most extreme cases, if at all. Personally, I can’t condemn someone based on their thoughts or beliefs, only their deliberate actions based on their reasonings behind it.

    DQ: Is there something wrong with people who aren't "transformed" by love? 256
    Answer: No, love is meant to be happy, for the lack of a better term, and it is definitely okay not to be interested or infatuated with love, or the idea of love. It is a personal preference, and some people can gain a lot more from something else besides love.

    DQ: Is impersonal love of "the True-the Beautiful-the Good" higher and better than love of & for another person, and than self-love?
    Answer: The love of one’s self is the highest, and often hardest, form of love to obtain. This leads to self-confidence, acceptance of person, and leads to the other forms of love. It’s hard to love and expect love in return when you don’t feel you are deserving of love to begin with, or don’t love or accept yourself.

    DQ: Is it ever appropriate for students and teachers to become emotionally and /or sexually involved? 264
    Answer: Not to sound predictable, I don’t believe so- specifically if the they are currently teacher/student OR if they’re in the same school (referring to secondary education and lower). This is something I feel intense about, especially since I know people on both ends of those types of relationships.


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  85. DQ: Is it ever acceptable to enter (unilaterally) into a deliberately passionless relationship or marriage? 266
    Answer: The only way that is acceptable is if it’s mutual and accepted. Even then, it shouldn’t happen because of holding each other back. However, passion is not necessarily a requirement for a happy and successful relationship.

    DQ: Is "Eye Rampantly Roving" inappropriately self-indulgent, to flirt with other men even though she says she loves her husband? 271
    Answer: I am on the side of the spectrum of being okay with this, as long as the flirter is clear that he/she isn’t available. However, it is not a good foundation for a healthy relationship.

    DQ: Would you ever marry someone you found physically unattractive?
    Answer: Yes, but there’s a difference between a lack of attraction and repulsion. I would marry someone I felt no physical attraction for, but knew was a good (I dislike using that word) person. However, I wouldn’t if I felt repulsion and/or a negative feeling. I try to base my feelings on the person and not their appearances, however in order to enjoy my life I would have to ‘draw a line,’ so to speak.

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  86. Our peripatetic group discussed the sexual relations of teachers and students. We seemed to agree that as long as both are consenting adults and they are not currently teacher-student, it is ethically okay for such a relationship to happen.

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  87. I understand that I have an over exuberant inflation of both my wisdom and physical attraction. I am a self admitted egotist which can be both good and bad because I maintain a certain confidence level however when I'm a am deflated I crash hard.

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  88. I believe that it requires a certain degree of intelligence in order to get away with breaking the rules. However I believe that just the breaking of the rules is not admirable in itself. In the case of social rules if it is for the greater good then standing out can be a very good thing.

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  89. I think that society does indeed think to much of charismatics people just your ability to think more quickly and smoothly does not necessarily make you of any better meddle than anyone else.

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  90. Every one that chases fame wishes to have there name on the lips of every person that speaks. So the specific answer to the question is yes of course there are still people in society that strive for fame to that extent.

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  91. I honestly don't think I would ever marry someone I found unattractive. Not due to me being a shallow person or anything but due to the fact that I feel like an initial physical attraction is what kicks off any type of intimate relationship. Sure we can say we are "personality" people but something has to initially catch your eye about a person and it's impossible to read a person's whole personality at first glance.

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  92. I think it is wrong to enter into a relationship or marriage knowing that there is no passion on your end. Eventually that lack of passion is going to become too strong and the relationship will have to end. And now not only have you broken a heart, you've potentially scarred an innocent person from feeling strong emotions for someone else.

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  93. I think that our sexual views are moving more toward that of the Greeks with many different sexuality's becoming more and more socially accepted. I believe that these people should be respected however it is not something that we should encourage more than regular sexuality.

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  94. It is dangerous to both religion and democracy to alter these people above the every day people means they will be exemplified in politics and in religion alike I can almost relate this to the ideology of the catholic pope (the leader of a nation)and a strong religious influence.

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  95. Yes, because once you fall in love you should strive to be a better version of yourself in order to achieve a better mate for your significant other to love.

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  96. an intense feeling of deep affection. I think in order for it to be intense you need to focus that intensity on a specific person.

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  97. There can be a significant age difference between student and teacher however once you get to the college the age difference can juristically decrease to the point where the student can actually be older then the professor so in short the answer is no love works in mysterious ways and you cant really decide who you love therefore to say that you can not love someone simply because of what they do for a living.

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  98. The answer to a passionless relationship strictly depends on your definition of passion the oxford definition of it is nearly uncontrollable emotions so I think it is not necessarily.

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  99. uhm you shouldn't knowingly flirt with intention when you are married this leads to sin. I think to observe the beauty of humanity is alright but to take action with intents Is very wrong.

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  100. I don't think that I could ever marry someone that I did not find attractive mostly because I generally don't talk to anyone that I do not find attractive so for that reason I couldn't marry someone I never took the opportunity to get to know.

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