Up@dawn 2.0

Monday, November 14, 2016

Nov 16/17 quiz

1. What "oddity" enabled Socrates to ignore the political upheavals racking his city?

2. What was Socrates' attitude towards the politics of his day? OR, What was the point of his inquiries?

3. Who in our time help us appreciate the difficulties of the ancient Athenians in the face of Socrates' questions?

4. How was Socrates typically insincere?

5. What does the Euthyprho Dilemma make clear?

6. What danger faces contemporary philosophers who specialize in just one historical figure (Kant, Wittgenstein, Heidegger...)?

7. How can humans achieve a "less Christian and more Greek" form of immortality?

8. What did contemporary philosopher Harry Frankfurt discuss with Jon Stewart on The Daily Show?

9. What belief about moral accountability did Kant share with Plato?


DQ

  • Do you find it easy, or civically irresponsible, to shift your attention entirely away from the politics of the moment?
  • Is it possible, desirable, or defensible to "remove yourself from your own time"? 
  • If you find yourself out of step with most of your contemporaries, with regard to your most basic values and attitudes, should you speak up or lay low?
  • Do you think Socrates was criminally "impious," a disturber of the civic peace in Athens who deserved to be charged accordingly? 293 Or did he provide Athens a critical service they should have been grateful for? Should anyone ever be prosecuted for asking questions and challenging authority?
  • Is it okay to converse disingenuously, misleading people as to your confidence in the probity of their responses? 299
  • Are you persuaded by Plato's Euthyphro argument that the truth of our values must be established independently from the authoritative traditions and texts that extoll them? If something is good, is it good whatever the god(s) say(s)?
  • Can you have a favorite philosopher without compromising your critical independence from him/her? How?
  • Do you agree with Woody Allen on immortality?: “I don't want to achieve immortality through my work; I want to achieve immortality through not dying. I don't want to live on in the hearts of my countrymen; I want to live on in my apartment.” Is that possible? Will it ever be?
  • What do you think of the secular afterlife, the life that will continue on Earth after you're gone? Do you care about it? Is it possible that you care about it more than you care about living eternally in a heaven? (See Samuel Scheffler's The Afterlife)
  • How do you account for the fact that "there is so much bullshit" in our culture? What can be done about it?
  • If you do the right thing, does it matter why? (What would Kant and Plato say? How would you respond?)

80 comments:

  1. (H3) politics of the moment? No, especially sine politics in general, especially your own, is not usually the most light hearted of affairs, concentrating on it to much makes you cynic (not the philosophic kind) to little makes you blissfully ignorant. But everyone needs some kind of break form it.

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  2. (H3) time? Well if you consider time as merely a matrices of perception that can be ignored, than we can escape it for a time. However, I would argue that escaping it for to long, puts us in danger of missing it entirely, and getting lost in our own little worlds.

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  3. (H3) Socrates? Was he being disturbing of the civil peace, probably, but not enough to warrant prosecution I would say. I would not go as far as to ay he was rendering a service to Athens. Should anyone ever be persecuted for challenging authority? Depends how they challenge it.

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  4. (H3) probity? Yes, because that will, among other things lead to a lot more trouble down the road if you say one thing to one person and another thing to another, both thinking you are telling the truth.

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  5. (H3) Morality? Personal morality obviously is important, and while I think that, at least in my case, the edicts of God don't need to be questions they should be independently verified if you expect those who do not hold your beliefs to respect them as they would have no grounds to regard the roles of a god(s) they don't believe in or respect as setting forth legitimate rules.

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  6. (h3) favorite? Yes, just because you have a favorite doesn't mean you are closed off to all other views, just that you judge these views t be the best out of those you have heard so far. Being dogmatic and having favorites is different.

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  7. (h3) Immortality? Personally I do not think that sort of immortality will be a reality in the world we live in right now. Nor do I think it should be, as to gain eternal lie is to lose the eternal character or driving mortality that makes mankind. Not to mention the population problem.

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  8. (H3) Afterlife? I don't believe in an afterlife, secular or otherwise, I don't think at least. After we die, we sleep. When god chooses we will be raised from the dead and live bodily in a new world he creates. There is no after life because we don't move onto some spiritual plain, we will carry on in a new, physical one.

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    1. Just curious, but from where do you derrive that belief, the Bible? If so, why believe that part, and discount much of the rest?

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    2. I would love to agree or disagree with you, but I cannot because we simply do not know if there is an afterlife since none of us have explored it yet.

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  9. (H3) I find it extremely hard to turn away from politics. We are surrounded by politics and they are important to our lives.

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    1. They are everywhere, aren't they? Especially now. That being said, they're a great way to get stressed, and I simply don't have it in me to keep up with, fret about, and argue over every issue, all the time. I'm not suggesting we shun politics altogether — it's important to be involved in civil discourse about our future — but I do think we need a break every now and again. Instead of becoming outraged at everything, we can pick a few things we're truly passionate about and work on enacting positive change on those fronts!

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  10. (H3) I think it's near impossible to remove yourself from your time. You would literally have to work at home and not interact with many people in order to do that.

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  11. (H3) I think you should speak up if your values and attitudes are a lot different. There could be an issue with both you and society.

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    1. So if it is a small difference should I stay silent?

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  12. (H3) I don't think Socrates was a disturber of peace. He was peaceful in the ways he went about stating his opinions.

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  13. (H3) No one should be prosecuted for simply stating their beliefs or protesting the government. Everyone's opinion should be heard and taken into regard.

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  14. (H3) I think you could lead people to think your response will be different than what it actually would be but it's rude to do.

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  15. (H3) For me personally I believe that what God says is good, is good. In my relationship with God I want to closely follow Him as well as possible.

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  16. (H3) I don't agree with Woody Allen on immortality. I would rather leave behind a life or work that will live on instead of actually living forever myself.

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    1. But if you live on couldn't you do more than what you left behind?

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    2. The main problem with that (at least in fiction — I haven't bothered to ask any real immortals) is watching everyone you've ever cared about move on and die. You inevitably become detached and desensitized. Maybe you still care about your work (that could be a neat game, seeing how your legacy morphs and goes in and out of style as the years pass), but if so it's probably the only thing that you care about anymore.

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  17. (H3) It is not possible to obtain immortality in the fact of actually living forever. After the sin of Adam and Eve we weren't made to live forever.

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  18. (H3) I do care about the life of the Earth after I have passed. I hope that the generations to come will have an even better life and world than I have lived in.

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    1. I agree. After I pass, I want my kids and grandkids and so on to have a better life and Earth than I have.

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  19. (H3) I wouldn't say I care about the life on Earth after me as much as I care about Heaven. Heaven is the ultimate thing to look forward to and what I want to focus making sure people get to join me in going to while I am still on earth and sharing about Heaven.

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  20. (H3) I find it easy and civically irresponsible to shift my attention entirely away from the politics of the moment. Honestly, I did not follow this current presidential election like I should have. I do believe it is our responsibility to stay up to date on current politics and events. I got caught up in school work and it was just too easy to find additional, arguably more interesting distractions.

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  21. (H3) I like what Bryce said about escaping time. It is possible to remove yourself from your own time, finding a place to withdraw from the stress of your life, at least for a short amount of time. It can sometimes be desirable to get out of your own head, to remove yourself from a situation, to get a different perspective. It can also be defensible and understandable. Everyone needs a break from the chaos of their own lives.

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  22. (H3) I think if you are out of step with your contemporaries you should speak up. Just because you stand out from a crowd doesn't mean you are wrong. There is this saying, "What's right isn't always popular, and what's popular isn't always right." In any case, speaking your mind helps solidify your ideas and you might change someone else's mind, or at least give them a different perspective.

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  23. (H3) I don't think Socrates was criminally impious or a disturber of the civic peace. I think he provided people with an outlet for their frustrations and inquires. He challenged blindly-accepted norms and questioned what life means. I don't think anyone should be prosecuted for asking questions; perhaps there is a bigger problem if people are getting defensive about curiosity. As for challenging authority, in an appropriate setting, it can be very enlightening and stimulate useful discussion.

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  24. (H3) I think you can have a favorite philosopher without adopting their ideas. Just because I like the way a person's mind works and the conclusions they draw, doesn't mean I change my philosophy to mirror theirs. Appreciation don't equate to dependence. Having a firm grasp on what you believe can allow you to support a philosopher without adopting their ideas.

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    1. I like that answer a lot! We've learned about some really cool people in this class, but some of them held beliefs that I don't really find appealing. That's totally fine. People don't have to be perfect, and philosophies tend to not be perfect. But if you find one of either of those that inspires you, you can admire even if you disagree. That's the way I see it.

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  25. Is it possible, desirable, or defensible to "remove yourself from your own time"?

    It is barely possible, and I would say very deirable, as long as it was not one's status 100% of the time.

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  26. If you find yourself out of step with most of your contemporaries, with regard to your most basic values and attitudes, should you speak up or lay low?

    Depends on the beilief, as welll as the circumstances. Only speak up if there is a purpose to do so.

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  27. Can you have a favorite philosopher without compromising your critical independence from him/her? How?

    Of course. It's like having a best friend or significant other. You love them above others, but you do not necessarily reflect them yourself in every way. It would be weird if you did.

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    1. I agree, dependence usually does not matter on if you like one person more than others.

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  28. Do you agree with Woody Allen on immortality?: “I don't want to achieve immortality through my work; I want to achieve immortality through not dying. I don't want to live on in the hearts of my countrymen; I want to live on in my apartment.” Is that possible? Will it ever be?

    I love this quote, but I disagree. Living forever in this world, and thereby surpassing the lives of everyone you care about, would be miserable. I'd be very happy to live on in the hearts of my countrymen. And no, living forever in the literal sense is not possible, nor will it ever be.

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  29. What do you think of the secular afterlife, the life that will continue on Earth after you're gone? Do you care about it? Is it possible that you care about it more than you care about living eternally in a heaven?

    I desire both. I want the religious afterlife, and I want to live in a way that impacts the world for the better after I'm gone, regardless of whether or not I get any credit or renown from it. I think I care about equally for both "afterlives."

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  30. How do you account for the fact that "there is so much bullshit" in our culture? What can be done about it?

    I account for it by not expecting much better from depraved humanity, to which I myself belong. Nothing can be done by us to change our nature, but as individuals, we must commit to countering BS through living a virtuous life on the small scale.

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  31. I personally do find it comically irresponsible to shift your attention away from politics because no matter what your views are, they matter to some degree and can change the whole scheme of modern politics.

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    1. I agree with you, but to some extent I think a lot of us just want a break from politics, especially this election. Is it wrong to want to go on Social Media and see something other than Clinton and Trump?

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  32. I believe that it is possible to remove yourself from your own time mentally. At the moment, it isn't possible physically but it is definitely desirable to some.

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    1. Just wondering, how would one remove themselves mentally?

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  33. If you find yourself out of step with most of your contemporaries, with regard to your most basic values and attitudes, should you speak up or lay low?
    Speak up because every voice has a say and you may convince someone else to come to your way of thinking and can possibly change the views of masses.

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  34. I believe that you can have a favorite philosopher and still be independent. Just because you like one philosopher more than others does not mean you are dependent on them.

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  35. I do believe immortality is possible, just not yet with our science. One thing I've been curious about and want to go into neuroscience is to explore the brain and the concept of immortality or making it so our consciousness lives forever.

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  36. “Do you find it easy, or civically irresponsible, to shift your attention entirely away from the politics of the moment?”
    If an individual chose to block out politics, I believe they have the right to do so with the agreement that they must also accept whatever happens in their ignorance. If the vast majority did the same, they would either be civically inclined to change the law of the land to represent their new values or accept whatever happens when the minority takes advantage of the absence of those who chose to ignore it.

    “If you find yourself out of step with most of your contemporaries, with regard to your most basic values and attitudes, should you speak up or lay low?”
    If the incident leads to the harm of a person or group, I believe there is ethical incentive to try to stop it from happening. If the party decides to go along with it, as long as the person/group who may be harmed also gives consent, then that person has done what they can do. If the one who may be harmed has not given consent, I believe it is the responsibility of those who have the power to stop it to do so.

    “Should anyone ever be prosecuted for asking questions and challenging authority?”
    As long as ‘challenging authority’ does not involve harming a nonconsenting person, I believe questioning authority is a necessary part of society. If the authority meets those challengers with unnecessary force or harms a nonconsenting person, only then should that force be met and only if no other nonviolent options have been explored.

    “Is it okay to converse disingenuously, misleading people as to your confidence in the probity of their responses?”
    I believe that in most cases there is nothing wrong with such a practice. When someone inevitably does something against probability, the experience can be well worth it. It largely depends on the circumstances and the stakes of the outcome.

    “Can you have a favorite philosopher without compromising your critical independence from him/her? How?”
    Yes, fairly easily. If you studied one particular philosopher by comparing and contrasting that person to others, you then have a thorough knowledge of your one choice and a decent knowledge of the others.

    “Do you agree with Woody Allen on immortality? Is that possible? Will it ever be?”
    I am sure it will eventually become a reality for humans to cheat conventional death, though I believe tampering with such a natural process will, also inevitably, lead to something all together nonhuman in its existence. I believe it is better to use such a technology to give life to those who undeservingly would lose lengths of theirs than to extend the lives of any who want it.

    “Do you care about the life that will continue on Earth after you're gone?”
    I had never actually considered what all I would miss out on until Disney announced their plans of releasing a new Star Wars movie every year from here on out, funnily enough. While it saddens me to consider all that I will not be a part of, it is natural, and I would not have it any other way.

    “How do you account for the fact that "there is so much bullshit" in our culture? What can be done about it?”
    It seems that bullshit comes packaged with the human condition. In our ascent to our aspirations, many will do whatever they can to gain a leg up on the competition. Part of me says that that is just the way life works, and it should be expected and accepted. Another part says that we should strive to no longer need such tactics, though I know humans are too deeply ingrained into an emotional default setting.

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  37. H1
    DQ: •Do you find it easy, or civically irresponsible, to shift your attention entirely away from the politics of the moment?
    Right now I've decided that's for the best. To stress and be angry about things I am unable to influence is unhealthy and a waste of my time. I've decided to pay our pathetic politics little attention, and be more observant of the things that really matter.

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    1. H2
      I agree with you. Its futile to worry about things (Politics in this case) that will remain to be unfair/arbitrary/pointless no matter what you do. We have 2 options: 1) use energy and do nothing and 2) not use energy and do nothing. I vote for #2. Plus, #2 has the added bonus of you using that time/energy for things that can make you happy.

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  38. H1
    DQ: •Can you have a favorite philosopher without compromising your critical independence from him/her? How?
    Yes. I think this question ties in with Plato's talk in the most recent dialogue in our book. He brings up Aristotle, saying that people ended up using him as a reference, and blindly believed everything he said, without being critical. Plato brought up the difference between persuasion and influence. To be persuaded by a philosopher does nothing to a person's critical independence. To dogmatically believe everything that philosopher said is when people lose their intellectual independence.

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  39. H1
    DQ: •Do you agree with Woody Allen on immortality?: “I don't want to achieve immortality through my work; I want to achieve immortality through not dying. I don't want to live on in the hearts of my countrymen; I want to live on in my apartment.” Is that possible? Will it ever be?
    I wouldn't want to be immortal. I knew an elderly lady who was in her 90's. We visited her house once, and chatted with her as she lay sick in bed. Her room was full of large photos, and she told us about each of them. All had been friends and family, and all were dead. She had outlived her life. I don't see why outliving other people is considered something to be striven after. I'm glad to say that I don't think people will every have the chance to experience mortality, either.

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  40. H1
    DQ: If you do the right thing, does it matter why?
    Yes it does. If I give you money because I know you need it, and I care, I'm doing the right thing for the right reason. If I give you money because I want to make you trust me, just so I can use your debt to me as a power play, then my action has been selfish and hurtful. Reasons matter.

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  41. (H3) Do you find it easy, or civically irresponsible, to shift your attention entirely away from the politics of the moment?

    In some ways it could be irresponsible to just totally ignore politics if taken to the extreme of always ignoring politics all the time. I can completely understand it if someone would want to forget about politics and how they are going for awhile though, especially after this election. Personally for me, I find it fairly easy to ignore politics for some time.

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  42. (H3) How do you account for the fact that "there is so much bullshit" in our culture? What can be done about it?

    I would say that there is so much of it in our culture because our culture generally accepts it. People tend to expect a certain level of bullshit from others and when they get it they feel that that belief is validated and thus may feel that it's okay to add in their own bullshit, so it's sort of a self-fulfilling prophecy situation. If society started moving in a direction that allowed less bullshit they we would probably see a lot less of it in our culture.

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  43. (H3) Can you have a favorite philosopher without compromising your critical independence from him/her? How?

    I would say that you could. You can greatly admire someone while retaining your ability to criticize them. I would think that the easiest way to be capable of this would be to already have your own set of beliefs that you hold dear before reading up on a philosopher. Then you would be able to compare their beliefs alongside your own.

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  44. (H3) What do you think of the secular afterlife, the life that will continue on Earth after you're gone? Do you care about it? Is it possible that you care about it more than you care about living eternally in a heaven? (See Samuel Scheffler's The Afterlife)

    I've honestly never thought about the world in the "after I die" perspective. It never really occurred to me, mostly because I figured that I don't particularly care. That isn't totally true though, I do care, in the sense that I think there are things that need to be changed about the world so the time after I die is better for later generations. I've always believed that people should make the effort to make lives better here and now as opposed to waiting for the possibility of a perfect afterlife.

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  45. I think that it is not easy to shift your attention entirely away from the politics of the moment because it is literally everywhere. I don’t think it civically irresponsible to get away completely from politics for a minute because some people just need a break from it. I understand people are upset but the truth of the matter is the dude won and we just need to get on with life and find a way to make sure he keeps his stance on “Let’s Make America Great Again”, instead of constantly talking about it.

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  46. I think it is possible to “remove yourself from your own time”. In my opinion that just means to do something that is opposite of the social norm, escaping the restraints of the status quo.

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  47. I think you should always speak up, as long as you are respectful and not arrogant or ignorant, when it comes to your values and attitudes. No one should be ashamed or self-consciousness about their values and beliefs, even if it doesn’t fit the social norm.

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  48. I think you can have a favorite philosopher without compromising your critical independence from him/her, just by taking into consideration other’s opinions and not discarding them just because your favorite philosopher doesn’t agree with it.

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  49. I don’t agree with Woody Allen on immortality and I don’t think that it is possible or will ever be possible. I don’t agree just because I’m tired of pain and suffering in this world, so if there is an immortality in death that is better than this life then I will gladly take that immortality.

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  50. The secular afterlife is hard to think about because it’s hard to think about time going on and continuing without you. I do care what happens to my family after I’m gone and I do care about the impact, if any, that I will leave on the world.

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  51. I feel like “pop culture”, for the most part, is just made up of BS and all they spew is BS. So I don’t think we can really get rid of BS until we get rid of so called “pop culture”.

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  52. I think that doing the right thing matters because, I believe, the world is what you make of it. So if you put in good then you’ll receive good, in my opinion.

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  53. (H1) Do you find it easy, or civically irresponsible, to shift your attention entirely away from the politics of the moment?

    It is certainly not easy to shift attention away from current politics given all that is going on, but I don't think it is entirely irresponsible to do so either. While I think it is important to always stay aware of what is happening in the world around you, brief respites from such can do wonders for the mind, so that it does not get bogged down in all the political nonsense.

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  54. (H1) If you find yourself out of step with most of your contemporaries, with regard to your most basic values and attitudes, should you speak up or lay low?

    In certain climates it can be dangerous to voice a dissenting opinion, but if you are in a place in which you can do so then certainly one should speak up; it is discussion and dialogue that brings forth new thoughts and ideas and allows each of us to explore our own conceptions.

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  55. In a sense, I do nt think it matters why you do the right thing. However Plato and Kant would disagree based on their view on moral accountability. The more I thought about this question the more I realized that maybe making sure everyone knows why they are doing good things would encourage them to continue to do good deeds.

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  56. DQ: Do you find it easy, or civically irresponsible, to shift your attention entirely away from the politics of the moment?
    Answer: Easy?- Not of late, especially with the election and its results. Civically Irresponsible?- Perhaps, but sometimes it’s necessary to move on in daily life. I dislike when people say that people who don’t vote or turn their head to the election have no right to dislike the outcome. I disagree- there are sever circumstances that can make a vote not count, but people are too blinded to see this. Also, I prefer to only vote for someone I support, not vote just to vote against someone.

    DQ: Is it possible, desirable, or defensible to "remove yourself from your own time"?
    Answer: Possible- yes, for some. Desirable- again, yes for some. Defensible- I would say yes, because it is their time to remove themselves from. I feel as though I do this fairly often, especially when surrounded by nature or those I care about.

    DQ: If you find yourself out of step with most of your contemporaries, with regard to your most basic values and attitudes, should you speak up or lay low?
    Answer: I feel it is your RIGHT to step up to a certain extent, and that you should if it is on a substantial issue. However, unlike some philosophers, I don’t see the requirement to voice against other to the point of death. I say to speak when it feels wrong not to.

    DQ: Do you think Socrates was criminally "impious," a disturber of the civic peace in Athens who deserved to be charged accordingly? 293 Or did he provide Athens a critical service they should have been grateful for? Should anyone ever be prosecuted for asking questions and challenging authority?
    Answer: I think he did what he felt was right, and he gave many people a chance to have realization or clarity. However, he perhaps went a bit too far, and was definitely trying to be a martyr. I don’t feel they should be prosecuted for asking question or challenging authority, though he went to the extreme and beyond his rights of free speech.

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  57. DQ: Is it okay to converse disingenuously, misleading people as to your confidence in the probity of their responses? 299
    Answer: It’s okay to tell, or preach, what you honestly believe, as long as you are preaching it AS your beliefs, and not as the truth or fact. It is not okay to purposely mislead others of your intentions or beliefs, especially when it has a lasting effect on them.

    DQ: Are you persuaded by Plato's Euthyphro argument that the truth of our values must be established independently from the authoritative traditions and texts that extoll them? If something is good, is it good whatever the god(s) say(s)?
    Answer: I believe that our values belong to ourselves, and are our responsibilities. It’s not okay to try to force someone to have certain values or beliefs, or to push personal beliefs on others who do not want it. However, I don’t see it as wrong to have voluntary guidance to arrive at the values we decide on.

    DQ: Can you have a favorite philosopher without compromising your critical independence from him/her? How?
    Answer: Yes, especially if there are things you disagree about from their beliefs. If you idolize the philosopher and shape your beliefs and ideas to fit the mold of the favorite philosopher, there is no independence. However, there is independence in having a favorite philosopher as long as you have your own reasons for your beliefs, and perhaps there is a required separation on some beliefs for there to be independence.

    DQ: Do you agree with Woody Allen on immortality?: “I don't want to achieve immortality through my work; I want to achieve immortality through not dying. I don't want to live on in the hearts of my countrymen; I want to live on in my apartment.” Is that possible? Will it ever be?
    Answer: I don’t think it is possible, or that it will be. I also don’t believe it should. Death is a sensitive subject for most, but is largely so for me. I both agree and disagree with Allen, because I don’t want my ‘immortality’ to just be fame, but would rather it be in making a difference for others. My main goal in life is to make a difference or at least make a positive impression on one person- not everyone, because that’s impossible. The more the better, but I will die happy with just changing one life.

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  58. DQ: What do you think of the secular afterlife, the life that will continue on Earth after you're gone?
    Answer: I prefer not to think about this when possible. I think people in general make too large a deal about what they won’t be there for, and should focus on what they will be there for. Just physically being somewhere doesn’t do much- it’s being there, physically or in spirit, and making a positive difference or impression on the others there. EX- my dad at my graduation on his phone playing bubble saga VS him being actively engaged and paying attention to the present.

    DQ: Do you care about it? Is it possible that you care about it more than you care about living eternally in a heaven? (See Samuel Scheffler's The Afterlife)
    Answer: Once again, I prefer not to think of the afterlife at all. Perhaps it’s because I don’t want to think that my existence ends the day my time on earth is over. I honestly don’t know. This is why I try to make a positive different in the present, and not on guessing at something I will never know until I experience it.

    DQ: How do you account for the fact that "there is so much bullshit" in our culture? What can be done about it?
    Answer: I account for the bullshit because people often would rather focus on trivial things than what is actually important. Sometimes it’s a coping mechanism, sometimes distraction, sometimes avoidance- no matter the reason, it’s always diversion from the ‘larger than life’ aspects. What can be done about it? I have no idea. I feel that lowering the amount of bullshit should be a personal goal, and not something forced onto those that aren’t ready to lose it. Forcing someone into something that they’re not ready for is in no way beneficial to anyone.

    DQ: If you do the right thing, does it matter why?
    Answer: Yes. I’ve spoke on this before- “ends justify the means.” I’ll say again- I don’t think the important part of life is where we end up, but rather how we got there, and do we deserve to be where we are? I try to live by this- allowing myself to accept being somewhere else than where I expected as long as I got there according to my own personal values, and didn’t just focus on the end-point. The Journey is more important than the Destination.

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  59. I don't feel that it would be possible for me to completely ignore politics because it pays such a big role in my life that I can not focus on it.

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  60. since it is your time if you where to remove yourself from time as it is conceived you are not removing yourself from your time just because your time is specifically your interpretation of time.

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  61. speak up I would hope that you have evidence for your morals and because of that I would think it necessary for you to stand up and up and correct the wrongness in others or debate it to see the errors of your own ways.

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  62. I believe that it is ok to mislead people as far as your confidence level I do it at work every day I have to appear to be happy and content with my work even if I am currently really hating my life.

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  63. Yes you can find intelligence in ones argument even if you do not agree with it for instance I disagree with universal healthcare but I appreciate the logical arguments that people make for it.

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  64. I think that there is so much bullshit in our culture specifically because that is what people want to hear and wright about they want to hear what they want to hear and that is fluff.

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  65. I don't think it particularly matters why you do the right thing as long as you do it but you should never do the wrong thing for the right reason.

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  66. (H3) DQ: If you could "remove yourself from this time," what time would you want to put yourself in?

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  67. (H3) DQ: Are today's values ones that should be followed? Are they morally right?

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  68. (H3) There isn't really a way to get rid of the "bs" in our culture. Just like politics, it's an impossible thing to avoid considering it is all around us.

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