Up@dawn 2.0

Monday, October 31, 2016

Quiz Nov 2/3

1. Why was Plato so eager for a Googleplex tour? (Why did he think it so important to "understand our tools"?

2. What does Plato say lies beneath all perfection and beauty?

3. Why does Plato say he's always written "with the greatest misgivings"?

4. What was the subject of Plato's first search?

5. What renders an ethical decision non-arbitrary, according to Plato?

6. Who were the two guys in togas on the Googlers' t-shirts?

DQ

  • Do you think we adequately understand the Internet and our relationship to it?
  • Was there ever a time in your life when you didn't "google" information? How else do you get answers to your questions?
  • In what circumstances is it rude or socially unacceptable to look at screens when in the presence of peers?
  • Is philosophy "just one more subject to take in college - or not..." ? 87
  • What's the most useful information you've ever found on the Internet?
  • Do you think "crowdsourcing" is a good way to learn? Are individuals better or worse judges of the quality of their own lives?
  • What's the difference between information, knowledge, and wisdom? 100
  • Is it "only superior reason that can get a person out of the cave"? 102
  • Should we give more weight to the estimation of people who think their own lives are satisfactory, and who are judged by others as living well? 107
  • Why did it take (most) humans so long to realize that slavery is wrong?

Aristotle, Machiavelli, Sun Yat Sen, Elizabeth Barrett Browning
==
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/03/technology/how-the-internet-is-loosening-our-grip-on-the-truth.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share

A wider variety of news sources was supposed to be the bulwark of a rational age. Instead, we are roiled by biases, gorging on what confirms our ideas and shunning what does not.
==
On Point, on Google addiction...
==
FYI, from the provost: 

"the facilities use policy is here:http://www.mtsu.edu/policies/general-policies/I-01-06.php. I believe the events coordination office are the first responders on this, with ultimate decision-making policy depending on the venue requested."

97 comments:

  1. •Do you think we adequately understand the Internet and our relationship to it?
    o No, but I find it interesting how hypocrisy has a large part. An example would be to look at my mother’s generation. They grew up with very little technology- cars were a luxury, color televisions were rare, phones were bulky and had cords. Now, you would think it would be hard for her to work an iphone. But it’s not. Maybe in comparison to our generation, but people adjust themselves very quickly, especially when going from hard to easier. The internet is a handicap, and we don’t even see it
    •Was there ever a time in your life when you didn't "google" information? How else do you get answers to your questions?
    o Yes, my entire life until high school. I would go to the library, read encyclopedias, watch the news, etc. All the things that are barely even touched on in classes now how to do.
    •In what circumstances is it rude or socially unacceptable to look at screens when in the presence of peers?
    o Unless looking at it for a specific purpose- either related to the interaction, or an important personal matter- it is totally unacceptable to have out a screen when having an intimate interaction with other people.
    •Is philosophy "just one more subject to take in college - or not..."?
    o For some, yes. However, it can be eye-opening and life-changing. I personally have mixed feelings about it. I appreciate the mental challenge, but don’t like having to question everything.
    •What's the most useful information you've ever found on the Internet?
    o The most useful information I’ve ever found online is, in my opinion, the ever-spreading idiocy plaguing our nation.
    •Do you think "crowdsourcing" is a good way to learn?
    o Not at all. It is biased and unfair because there are groups of people who may not be represented in the crowd.

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    1. Christian Brooks (H3)12:18 PM CDT

      On crowdsourcing, what if the group is a representative sample of a population? Statistically, that would be fine, even if there was bias.

      Delete
  2. (H3) When Plato discusses Socrates and him being accussed of corrupting the youth, Cheryl immediately jumps to the conclusion of pedophilia. What do you think about the difference between corrupting the youth in Plato's day to today? Do you think people still corrupt the youth in the same way that Socrates did, example?

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    1. H1
      I think people still "corrupt the youth," although that's seen more in mindless pop culture than in philosophical discussion in today's society. One example of corruption that I would use is that of rock and roll, where musicians called out for rebellion and breaking the rules. There are many times when rebellion and rule-breaking are the right thing to do, but mindless and pointless rebellion is simply an equal (but opposite) evil as mindless conformity and obedience.

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    2. (H3) I really like that example. I didn't think about pop culture, but it is probably the best example. Not just music, but reality tv, movies, and advertisements in general influence what we buy, how we act, etc.

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    3. (H3) People today wouldn't consider what Socrates did corruption of youth. They probably wouldn't pay attention to it at all. It's interesting how the meaning of words and what we associate those words with has changed over time.

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    4. Christian Brooks (H3)12:20 PM CDT

      Some people still believe watching TV and playing video games are a form of corruption. Seeing a guy shouting different points of view out on the street is not much different, though it is harder to ignore.

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    5. Martin Davies12:51 PM CDT

      (H3) I don't think it's the media specifically that is corrupting the youth, but the extreme degree we go to them. The extreme exposure to violence and sex, we've become desensitized to it andoesn't apathetic.

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  3. (H3) Throughout the tour, Cheryl, the media escort, seems to think that Plato is somewhat clueless especially to technological and social norms, yet well-mannered and intelligent. Do you think a person's intelligence is based on the amount of stuff they know or their ability to apply it in certain situations, to make observations based on facts they were previously unaware?

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    1. (H3) That's the difference between someone who is smart and someone who is intelligent. A smart man can still know a lot, but an intelligent man can grasp stuff quicker and easier and then apply it to the situation.

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  4. (H3) What is the difference between knowledge and information?

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    1. H1
      Information is simply a possession of facts. Having a lot of info doesn't mean that it is internalized and is able to be actualized. Knowledge includes more; more context, a greater level of understanding. Knowing is possessing information, but in a way that can provide insight or action.

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    2. Christian Brooks (H3)12:23 PM CDT

      I think information is the bundles of facts that are grouped together into knowledge. Knowledgeable people know many things and can apply them to other situations, whereas an informed person knows just the specific information.

      Delete
  5. (H3) Plato puts a lot of emphasis on conversation as opposed to just writing, a one-sided debate. In today's age, do you think we talk more at people than we do to people, between social media, protests, and more? Why?

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    1. (H3) I would say we talk more at people. On social media especially we are talking to a void instead of an individual person. A message is put out there but communication doesn't really happen.

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    2. Martin Davies (H3)12:54 PM CDT

      We definitely talk at people more than we talk to them. Instead of not learning how to share we haven't learned how to listen.

      Delete
  6. (H3) I believe that we do not adequately understand even the small percentage of the internet that we access on a daily basis. However, we depend on the internet to provide us with answers/solutions to our daily life problems. Though we don't understand how it works, we are completely okay with accepting the answers it provides us.

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  7. (H3) Internet and our relationship? I honestly think we don't. Think of it this way, if you woke up one day and found yourself going to MTSU in 1950 and your philosophy teacher told you to go do research on a philosopher and right a report on him. What would you do?

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    1. H1
      The library sure would get a lot more use. I don't know if old-school book research is better. It certainly isn't as swift or (seemingly) efficient as the internet, but perhaps the necessary skimming of information when looking for answers provides more context and resulting understanding of the subject.

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    2. (H3) I would be forced to go to the library and dig up information in books. These papers would take much longer to do back then, we have definitely developed a reliance on the internet.

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  8. (H3) There are times when I don't Google things. Luckily I have amassed a modest collection of reference material for that purpose. When I can I prefer to go to my library instead of google.

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  9. (H3) Screens? When your obviously ignoring them or not paying attention.

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  10. (H3) Philosophy? No, especially if you start to look at philosophers from the Hellenistic age you see that philosophy is the pursuit to live well, not just something you take for a humanities credit.

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  11. (H30 Useful thing on the internet? Audible.com and Youtube.com I read a lot of audiobooks and youtube is surprisingly useful when your trying to get through high school algebra.

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  12. (H3) Crowed-sourcing? I think it's a good way to find out the general consensus, not necessarily a good way to learn.

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  13. (H3) Well one reason is it was a valid and defended practice for so long. Religion validated it, philoosphers like Aristotle validated it, and in more modern times Fitzhugh did. Also we think slavery is wrong because we believe that every human being has the "Right" to choose their own life, and should be given the "freedom" to do so. These are relatively new concepts.

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  14. H1
    DQ: Do you think we adequately understand the Internet and our relationship to it?
    I most definitely do not. I know for sure that I have a very loose and vague understanding of the mechanism of the internet. Like my car; I don't really know how it works, but I drive around in it a lot. I think our understanding of our relationships to it is ever more vague; I use it almost entirely as a tool, for school and random research. I know many people feel that they connect with a personal culture and friend group, simply by participating in websites, by blogging, commenting, etc. These values and ideas are constantly being questioned and examined.

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  15. H1
    DQ: Was there ever a time in your life when you didn't "google" information? How else do you get answers to your questions?
    Yes there was; I remember when I would ask my mom or dad all the questions that came into my head on my way home from first grade. Today I do a lot of googling for answers, but I also have the wonderful luxury of owning many books, and I can also use them as reference.

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  16. H1
    DQ: In what circumstances is it rude or socially unacceptable to look at screens when in the presence of peers?
    This is a difficult question. It really seems to depend on the group of peers. I know people who are constantly on their phones, and others who rarely have them in sight. I have noticed that when several people pull out their phones, everybody whips them out. I've noticed that a lot in philosophy class; when several people get away with messing on their phones during the lecture, more people start doing that as well.

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    1. Martin Davies (H3)12:57 PM CDT

      There was definitely a spike in laptops in the h3 class when someone mentioned having theirs our during lecture.

      Delete
  17. H1
    DQ: Is philosophy "just one more subject to take in college - or not..." ?
    I think philosophy is just as limited as mathematics and music and history and business and etc. College courses, especially undergraduate ones, are simply general introductions to vast seas of knowledge. As philosophy is in everybody's mind and shapes their actions, I think it is incredibly important.

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  18. H1
    DQ: •Do you think "crowdsourcing" is a good way to learn?
    It can be, I don't think it is always so. I know a lot of people who think they know a lot about music, and have strong opinions about it. If you asked a crowd of regular people (say through the means of EASE) if music is an universal language, most would say yes. But they'd be wrong; it a universal human phenomena, but after listening to traditional music from areas around the world, you realize that our western ear finds much music laughable and hideous. Asking multiple experts and experienced people in a field, however, can prove more fruitful and accurate than only asking one person.

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  19. H1
    DQ: •What's the most useful information you've ever found on the Internet?
    I've found Kahn Academy to be pretty darn useful on understanding mathematics. Youtube has a whole lot of fascinating educational videos and documentaries too; all you have to do is look for them.

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  20. (H3) Do you think we adequately understand the Internet and our relationship to it?
    The internet is too vast for us to fully understand it or have just one kind of relationship with it. There's so much at our fingertips that we often don't know what to do with it and end up hours deep into Youtube videos.

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  21. (H3) Was there ever a time in your life when you didn't "google" information? How else do you get answers to your questions?
    As a child all my questions were answered by my mom or dad, but eventually I had questions they didn't have answers to. And by the time I had questions vast enough that could only be answered by the internet, Google was already one of the top search engines. I've done papers cited with just physical texts, but google is a much better option for research.

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  22. (H3) I don't think we adequately understand our relationship with the Internet. It has become a vital part to our everyday lives which is a little frightening.

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  23. (H3) When I was younger I didn't google things. I either asked people questions or looked up information in books.

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  24. (H3) In what circumstances is it rude or socially unacceptable to look at screens when in the presence of peers?
    If we are just talking about occasional glances that may keep our eyes glued for more than 5 seconds, I would say never. It's a part of our society now. We as a people are so busy and consumed in everything around us at all times that we have to keep up with what is going on outside of the dinner table or lecture or else we feel there is some kind of consequence or loss.

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  25. (H3) I find it rude to look at your screen anytime you're trying to have an actual conversation with someone. It is also rude when talking to a worker trying to help you or when ordering.

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  26. (H3) Is philosophy "just one more subject to take in college - or not..." ?
    For some people, it is. While I do have an interest in philosophy, and more so now that i've been taking the course, I might not have taken it if it wasn't required. After taking this course though, I see philosophy a lot differently and how it's influenced our society and history so much. A good teacher who encourages his students to get involved can certainly make philosophy more than just one subject in college.

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  27. (H3) For me personally I would say philosophy and my own philosophy is something I can and have formed on my own that changes with my amount of knowledge. Philosophy isn't a necessary in my mind for a good education.

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  28. (H3) There can't be one most useful thing I have found on the internet. I find resources for schoolwork all the time, new music, tabs for guitar, devotionals, etc. The internet is full of useful information.

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  29. (H3) What's the most useful information you've ever found on the Internet?
    Possibly an unpopular opinion for it's lack of credibility because anyone can edit the information on it, but I am addicted to Wikipedia. I will look up one thing out of curiosity and an hour and a half later I have 20 different tabs open on articles that string together until I'm nowhere near I started.

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  30. (H3) I don't think there was ever a time that I didn't "Google" information, but there was definitely a time I didn't use it as frequently as I do now. I relied primarily on my mom, textbooks, other printed resources, and TV/ documentaries. I was really into nonfiction books and TV shows for a while, usually relating to biology, Discovery Channel and so on. When I wanted a specific question answered, I usually asked my mom who probably, in hindsight, Google it or had previously.

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  31. (H3) There are many times when it is rude or socially unacceptable to look at screens in the presence of peers. Eye contact displays respect, at least in American culture. By looking down or preoccupying other senses with other activities, you are distracting yourself from your peer or instructor. By dividing your attention between a computer screen and the speaker, you are saying that that person's ideas are not worth your full and undivided attention.

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  32. (H3) Honestly, I did originally take philosophy to fulfill my humanities credit. However, I am glad that I took it because I got to learn about and understand different philosophies of life and philosophers. It gave me an opportunity to understand and develop my own philosophy of life as well. I think that certain people get more out of a philosophy class than others. For some, it is just another subject, like any other class, to take. For others, it opens their mind and allows them to perceive ideas they did not previously take into account.

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  33. (H3) I believe it took most humans so long to realize that slavery was wrong because, for one, it was a source of income, cheap labor, and they were unwilling to part with the profits they were making. People based their lives, prosperity, and status on that source of labor. Also people have this superiority complex that makes them seek out those they are "better" than, in certain aspects. By putting others down, they elevated their own status. In the end, it was about maintaining a certain image. It was also hard to admit they were wrong after so long.

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  34. (H3) I think crowdsourcing is a good way for a company or organization to learn more about their consumers. As purely a way to learn, I'm not sure that's the best way but it is certainly a way to learn.

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  35. (H3) The most useful information I've ever found on the internet is hard to pinpoint. Certain sites are definitely more helpful than others, Khan academy and other academic resources. The great thing about the internet, in my opinion, is not the information itself, but the volume of information and the speed at which it can be obtained. There are so many perspectives and they are at the tip of your fingers in a matter of seconds.

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  36. Do you think we adequately understand the Internet and our relationship to it?

    No, Im afraid, as Goldstein pointed out, that too many of us see the internet as techno-magic. Taking the internet for granted is an unfortunate disregard for all the work done by technological pioneers to bring it to us. Not to mention the danger of "becoming the tools of our tools."

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  37. Was there ever a time in your life when you didn't "google" information? How else do you get answers to your questions?

    There was a time in my life I did not google things, but it happens that that was also the time when I still thought my parents knew EVERYTHING. So I treated my parents like we often treat google, asking question upon question, often to their annoyance.

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  38. In what circumstances is it rude or socially unacceptable to look at screens when in the presence of peers?

    I would say it is rude in nearly all situations, but still socially acceptable in many. We've become a society in which rudeness is an accepted norm. I try to avoid my screens at all costs when with others, but it can be so easy to forget manners and do "what everyone else does."

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  39. What's the most useful information you've ever found on the Internet?

    Due to the "vastness upon vastness" of information available on the internet (as Marcus put it) I think it nearly impossible for me to pinpoint the most useful piece of information I have ever retrieved from it. I love to gather trivial and fun information about diverse subjects though, so perhaps all those things collectively are what I am most grateful for, even though they may not be strictly useful.

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  40. Do you think "crowdsourcing" is a good way to learn?

    On opinion questions, undoubtedly. Crowdsource when you want to know where to set the thermostat. On ethical questions, certainly not. First of all, the majority can be wrong thanks to ignorance or social norms of their time. Secondly, like Plato pointed out in our reading, giving weight to some votes above others based on their percieved expertise is a bias in itself, which relies entirely on the crowd to begin with. I don't think we should crowdsource, but then again I don't think relinquishing all decision making capacities to a handfull of professionals or elected officials is optimal either. I personally don't know what would serve as the best alternative.

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  41. (H3) Weekly essay: Comparing class readings
    After months of waiting, we are finally picking back up Rebecca Goldstein's "Plato at the Googleplex" and I couldn't be more excited.
    Out of the three readings we have gone through: Rebecca, Russell, and Gros, this was the only one to both confuse and intrigue me. The syntax is a nightmare, but bringing a philosopher to the modern day for a chat is probably one of the most genius ways to teach philosophy in writing.
    There's a reason I regard Goldstein's book at the best, though. Plato at the Googleplex is the happy medium between an easy read on Peripitetics and a lengthy novel on the condensed history of philosophy that I had to take page by page. Goldstein offers fresh ideas and an innovating writing style that keeps the readers interested but makes them work for their understanding. She treats her audience with the maturity and intellect they deserve, but also has no problem pulling out modern day references as a gag or a non-sophisticated comparison. She treats philosophy as a concept that anyone has the ability to understand, not something that only "great minds" can enjoy.
    I say all of this, but this is not a criticism of Russell or Gros by any means. Gros, because of the nature of his book, is on a different level and isn't quite comparable to the other two readings. I enjoyed Russell as well, I went back to read some of Russell's chapters that we didn't cover because I was enthralled with the history and commentary that only he could provide.
    All three readings have been great for this class. But now that we are reading Rebecca Goldstein again, I have no doubt I will begin to fully enjoy Plato as much as she does.

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  42. (H3) Crowdsourcing is a good way to obtain basic information. In order to really know the facts about something you should research it from professional sources or books.

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  43. (H3) Slavery was a socially acceptable thing for a long time. Since people didn't view it as negatively and just accepted the norm, it took society a long time to see the truth that slavery is extremely wrong.

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  44. DQ: Are philosophers the only important people?

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  45. DQ: Do you consider your misfortune more important than other peoples misfortune?

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  46. DQ: Is there a difference in judging yourself and judging others?

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    1. Yes, there is. Most judge themselves much harder than they judgs others. This may because we ourselves are trying to be the best we can possibly be and we see others in a different light.

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  47. DQ: Is there such thing as a noble lie? If so, what classifies as a noble lie?DQ

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    1. I think there may be such a thing as a noble lie and my classification for it would be if it was a lie to save a life.

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  48. When it comes to understanding the internet, most people do not understand it at all. Most do not look into how it works and why it works in a certain way. Most just are not curious, including myself. It may be useful to adequately understand the internet, but I just do not have any interest in it, like the majority of the population.

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  49. Though I use Google a lot, I do not always go to Google. Sometimes I prefer books. For example, when it comes to medieval war strategy, I would rather look for ancient texts from the medieval period on the strategy of empires over googling the information. One reason for this is because I trust the books much more since it is getting harder and harder to determine what is a fact on the internet.

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  50. When is it socially unacceptable or ride to look at screen among peers? Whenever in a conversation with one another or at some sort of meeting that requires interaction because when you are looking at a screen and not at someone, it portrays that person as uninviting and you are less likely to talk to them even though you may need to.

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  51. Christian Brooks (H3)12:13 PM CDT

    “Do you think we adequately understand the internet and our relationship to it?”
    It seems to me that the understanding of its danger scales with age, while the understanding of its extent scales with exposure. Younger people stay up-to-date on what technology can do, and they understand the caveats that come with a medium through which anything can be accessed. Older people, or at least those without the extent of exposure, are a bit more wary of it; if they were to know the full potential it has I feel that they would be even more wary of it.
    ---
    “Was there ever a time in your life when you didn't "google" information? How else do you get answers to your questions?”
    I think people my age and younger have always had the option to google for information, though many had to wait to do it at school in our younger years. We are all aware of the other options for information (books, newspapers, interviews, etc. aren’t foreign), but due to our culture the option of internet will always be the foremost option in our minds.
    ---
    “In what circumstances is it rude or socially unacceptable to look at screens when in the presence of peers?”
    I think technology usage depends on the relationship and setting. If I am with my friends staying on my phone is mostly acceptable, but we were in class and they were presenting a project it becomes unacceptable. A more direct answer would include work, school, when on a date, in the theatre, at a movie, driving, and other situations that usage has the potential result in harm to someone from inattention.
    ---
    “Is philosophy ‘just one more subject to take in college - or not...’?”
    I think for a large majority of people, philosophy is just a superfluous way of thinking. For those who can take the time to explore philosophy, or those who would like to, philosophy is more than a room you go in for three hours a week.
    ---
    “What’s the most useful information you’ve ever found on the internet?”
    Most of the information I find on the internet can be categorized as ‘fun facts’ or superfluous information (something that would never be actually useful for daily life); other than academic research, which is supposed to always be useful information, the most likely answer is anything that resulted in me becoming mentally healthier.
    ---
    “Do you think crowdsourcing is a good way to learn?”
    I believe it is useful but not always accurate or reliable. Humans naturally crowdsource, whether they intend to or not. We are naturally looking for social cues to help us through our day, though what we pick up along the way may not always be right or correct.
    ---
    “Why did it takes (most) humans so long to realize that slavery is wrong?”
    Humans are creatures of habit, and many actions that are deeply rooted in tradition are seen as correct forms of behavior. When one is raised to believe and act a certain way in a culture, whether that be slavery or washing your hands before dinner, the amount of time the individual exercises that behavior is deeply related to all the cultural circumstances that keep it in place or leave it behind.

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  52. For many people, philosophy is just another subject to take in college, but for some, philosophy is a way of life. Always questioning and pondering the important questions or even seemingly unimportant ones. To these people, philosophy is not just a subject to study.

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  53. The most useful information that I have found on the internet is a hard one to pick out. For me, in going into a career in which a resume is needed. Searching how to build a good resume is probably the most useful thing I have ever searched

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  54. I don't always google things, I don't know. And honestly it is usually a last resort, if I can't find the information I need in a textbook or from a classmate. If it is an obscure subject that I just want to know more about I use google to find more reliable references overall.

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  55. I think we don't quite realize the impact of our relationship with the internet. Especially since most of this generation has grown up with it, it can be easily taken for granted and overlooked on how it really has affected our lives as humans.

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  56. In my opinion, why I think it took humans so long to realize that slavery is wrong is because for one, the dominant religion is Christianity and the bible has nothing against slavery. Most civilization thought themselves the most superior so any other civilization that they conquered were under them and therefore made slaves. I think it finally took us realizing the fact that we are all the same but unique individuals to realize that slavery is wrong.

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  57. Many may not try to understand the Internet because they find other things more interesting that they focus their attention to. But the lack of understanding comes back, when they don't realize how what they look at may influence their thinking. Search results are bias, and people also become dependent upon it, not knowing how to ask questions then discover the answers for themselves. I will agree though that the Internet offers information in a quick way, so we use time more efficiently. Perhaps we continue our reliance to aid this generation's lifestyle.

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  58. It took humans so long to realize slavery was wrong because it was our normal for so long. People have a harder time questioning the norms if it is already readily accepted and internalized in us from childhood.

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    1. I agree. I think slavery was just accepted widely like an ideology. It had been happening for years and they had found people they could easily exploit for labor.

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  59. Christian Brooks (H3)12:25 PM CDT

    DQ: Would it ever be ethically acceptable for a company such as Google to withhold information for 'the greater good'? How does a private industry's circumstances compare to the government's?

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  60. The think I began using Google when researching questions for school. Before then, like most, I used books from the library or just asked teachers or my parents. Sometimes I value textbooks over a Google search, just because it can be more difficult finding reliable resources.

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  61. I think it took long for people to realize slavery was wrong because not many were willing to challenge the ideology, especially if it was accepted by the government or religion. Our concept of human rights is relatively new. How do you think it came about?

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  62. I don't think philosophy is just a college course to take. It helps me shape how I would like to live as well as to know the perspectives of others in understanding how they live.

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  63. (H1) Was there ever a time in your life when you didn't "google" information? How else do you get answers to your questions?

    The internet grew up at the same time I did, so there was never really a time when I couldn't just look up information I desired to know. However, as a child when I didn't use the internet, my common source of knowledge was my parents, who knew absolutely everything in the world, or at least young me thought so. It never occurred to me where their knowledge came from, which might have just been life experience.

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  64. (H1) In what circumstances is it rude or socially unacceptable to look at screens when in the presence of peers?

    In instances when someone else is speaking to the group and you are distracted by the screen in front of you. Or in the instance when you are speaking but you're looking at a screen - not for any type of information - in which case you come off as uninterested. Using screens during conversation with peers can be helpful thought if you're looking up pertinent information.

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  65. (H1) Do you think "crowdsourcing" is a good way to learn? Are individuals better or worse judges of the quality of their own lives?

    Every person has their own unique experiences and input to bring into a conversation or contribute to an idea. Crowdsourcing is a good way of combining the knowledge that everyone possesses to come about a more logical or beneficial solution. Each individual is the only one who can say definitely what makes their life worth-while to them, but at the same time, it is also common to confront friends for advice on certain aspects of life one might want help fixing.

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  66. (H1) Is philosophy "just one more subject to take in college - or not..." ? 87

    While for some philosophy may just be a requirement to get through, it can also provide intellectual stimulant and be good for getting people to really think about and examine things. Philosophy is something everyone dabbles in in life, whether they realize it or not.

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  67. (H1) What's the difference between information, knowledge, and wisdom?

    I believe information is just plain stimulus for your sense to take in, knowledge is what you specifically learn, and wisdom is how you apply the information and knowledge you have gained.

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  68. (H1) Why did it take (most) humans so long to realize that slavery is wrong?

    Societal bonds are hard to break, especially if it's an ingrained idea that people are born into for generations. People were constantly taught that it was ok, so therefore it was.

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  69. H1
    (First 2 questions)

    When I was growing up I didn't have fast internet or was ever inside to use it. This doesn't mean I wasn't curious; it just means I was preoccupied. Google in my house was my mom. When ever I was curious about something I would ask my mom, grandmother, or teachers and in elementary school they remembered enough to answer my questions. as I grew older they could answer fewer and fewer questions and that is when I started using google. I didn't really understand the internet and didn't need to. I asked it told. I think very few people actually understand the internet, but slightly more see how are relationship to it has changed over the years. The internet has enslaved us to the point where many rely on it only to find information which is not always true.

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  70. (H2) Was there ever a time in your life when you didn't "google" information? How else do you get answers to your questions?

    When I was in elementary school I had an assignment or two where we had to use an encyclopedia for some of our information. While I know the purpose of this was to teach us about how an encyclopedia works (since at the time my school didn't, have many computers) I sometimes wonder if it was, at least in part, some last ditch effort to try to show us that the internet wasn't the only place to get information. Though perhaps making us flip through outdated books for information on Nebraska was not the best way to go about this. If anything it instilled a distaste book research, especially since none of us were particularly stupid children and knew that newer and more relevant information could be found on the magical box just within our sight.

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  71. I do believe that I adequately understand the internet I use it to the needs I need there is very little instances when I believe I needed the internet and I did not use it. of course I wouldn't know if the internet could suit my need because it would be a capability of the internet that I would be unaware of.

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  72. There was a time when I did not have access to the internet so I could not google it but the scary thing about that is that I would text other people to google stuff or even ask my father to google things that I did not know.

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  73. I feel horribly disrespected when I'm on a date and a female looks at her phone I leave my phone in the truck or at home however since It has become socially acceptable to do that I feel obligated to not say anything.

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  74. I thought at firs philosophy was just one more subject to take in college but I have found that it is much more then that I have found that it actually makes me think about what I think and it has affected my other classes for the better.

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  75. The most singular useful information I found on the internet I would have to say would be a citation machine because I literally have used the same website for every paper since the sixth grade.

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  76. I believe that others are better judges of us then we are ourselves mostly because we can be led astray and believe that what we are doing is right even when it is wrong I know I have been led astray before.

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  77. Information is what you want to attain knowledge is what you have wisdom is your experience

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  78. according to Plato I believe the only thing that would get you out of the cave is the escape to the higher reality to me this could even mean death once we are dead all questions of existence are answered aren't they.

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  79. I don't believe that anyone should necessarily judge maybe just try and lead people in the right direction it is very difficult to tell someone what is right and wrong when you yourself are wrong by the others point of view.

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  80. It took people so long to see the wrongness in slavery because it is what they where taught from there youth to there age it is very difficult to say that something is wrong when it is all that has been taught all your life.

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