Up@dawn 2.0

Monday, April 18, 2016

Quiz Apr19 (Part 1)

Nietzsche, Freud (LH); WATCH: Nietzsche (SoL); LISTEN: Aaron Ridley on Nietzsche on Art and Truth (PB); Jung & the mind (HI)...Podcast

1. Was Friedrich Nietzsche speaking literally when he said "God is dead"?

2. Where did Nietzsche say values like compassion, kindness, and consideration came from?

3. What did Nietzsche call the future type of person who renounces conventional moral codes, and why does Nigel find it worrying?

4. What kind of cure led to psychoanalysis?

5. What did Sigmund Freud consider the "third great revolution" in thought?  177

6.  What is a Freudian slip?


 
DQ
1. Polls show that increasing numbers of people, especially young people, describe themselves either as "nones" (with no specific religious denominational identity) or as "spiritual, not religious." Does this support Nietzsche's proclamation?

2. Does it matter where values came from, if they are good values? Why do you think people behave with kindness, compassion, and consideration?

3. Do people who renounce conventional moral codes succeed in placing themselves "beyond good and evil"? Do you renounce any moral conventions? How? Why?  

4. Which is more effective for most people with emotional issues, talk or medication? What's the best "medicine" for sadness, in your experience?

5. Is the "unconscious" real? Can it be studied scientifically?

6. Can the forces of reason and irrationality be effectively balanced? Do you attempt such a balance in your own life and personality? Explain.

An old post-
Our text rightly (if inconsistently) points out the non-literal intent of Nietzsche’s infamous “God is dead” proclamation. More to come on that too. Meanwhile, the theists among us will enjoy imagining that their God has the last word.



Aaron Ridley points out that Nietzsche split from Schopenhauer (as he eventually split from everyone) over the question of where we should go after god's "funeral." Ultimately Nietzsche thought we should find a way to go back to our lives, and to affirm them. Schopenhauer, he decided, was a nihilist content to wallow in ultimate meaninglessness (or adopt that pose)... except while walking his poodles or visiting the art gallery or attending a concert. But isn't that the very stuff of life? It's the stuff Nietzsche's "eternal recurrence" challenges us to affirm.
What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: "This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more; and there will be nothing new in it, but every pain and every joy and every thought and sigh and everything unutterably small or great in your life will have to return to you, all in the same succession and sequence—even this spider and this moonlight between the trees, and even this moment and I myself. The eternal hourglass of existence is turned upside down again and again, and you with it, speck of dust!"
Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus? Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him: "You are a god and never have I heard anything more divine." If this thought gained possession of you, it would change you as you are or perhaps crush you. The question in each and every thing, "Do you desire this once more and innumerable times more?" would lie upon your actions as the greatest weight. Or how well disposed would you have to become to yourself and to life to crave nothing more fervently than this ultimate eternal confirmation and seal? -"The Greatest Weight" (in The Gay Science) [When Nietzsche Wept]


Ridley doesn't talk about that, but he's helpful with the Apollonian-Dionysian distinction.

In the final analysis, Nietzsche thought what didn't kill us, what merely made us suffer, made us stronger. That's his blustering pose. It's kind of pathetic. I'd have to agree with James, who pitied "poor Nietzsche's antipathies" and likened Schopenhauer and Nietzsche to a pair of rabid rats in a cage (or think of alienated Dwayne in Little Miss Sunshine, in his room)... largely a cage of their own design.

But what would Freud say?




Freud is darker than Nietzsche… Sheer joy and sheer affirmation of life is pretty hard to find, if you’re being absolutely honest about what reality is.
As long as your ideas of what’s possible are limited by what’s actual, no other idea has a chance.

If life is a gift, then the more you partake in it, the more you show thanks. Susan Neiman, Moral Clarity: A Guide for Grown-up Idealists...

Some wonder what makes Freud a philosopher. In the spirit of Carlin Romano I wouldn't worry about that. He philosophized (albeit reluctantly, says one biographer) about civilization, psychic health, happiness, religion, the material mind, conscience, consciousness, and the scope of philosophy itself.

Philosophy is not opposed to science, it behaves itself as if it were a science, and to a certain extent it makes use of the same methods; but it parts company with science, in that it clings to the illusion that it can produce a complete and coherent picture of the universe. Its methodological error lies in the fact that it over-estimates the epistemological value of our logical operations…

Like Kierkegaard, Freud endlessly mucked around in the morass of anxiety and depression and, like those other great explorers of the mind, was often accused of being of too depressing. Yet, when pressed to provide some positive vision of health, Freud more than once implied that what is fundamental to happiness is the ability to love and work; that is, to be able to invest in something other than yourself. G. Marino, "Freud asPhilosopher"

"Frude had it all figured out," insisted Barney Fife, a guy I'd not have expected to endorse the Oedipal Complex. But Mayberry was always just a dream, anyway. We need our dreams of a better world, of a safer space.

37 comments:

  1. Mariem Farag #12
    Which is more effective for most people with emotional issues, talk or medication? What's the best "medicine" for sadness, in your experience?
    Talking things out is the best medicine out there for people with emotional issues. From my experience, it is very important to find someone who you can talk to about how you're feeling. If you happen to believe in God, then by all means talk to him about how you're feeling; pray for happiness and peace within yourself. Keeping it to yourself can cause some serious damage. Also, examining your life and spotting out all the positive things in it, can change your mood quickly. Find things to be thankful for; try to ignore anything that causes you pain/sadness for just a moment. You are probably way more blessed than many people out there; you just don't know it yet, because you allow your mind to tell you things that are only true in your mind. Over thinking everything can lead to disaster; it's all in the mind. looking at life in a positive way, even in the midst of the most tragic events going on in your life right now, and talking it out with someone you trust, can help cure you from any sadness. It works with me.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Kali Sunstrom # 12
    I agree with Mariem talking things out is better than any medicine. I know a lot of people who take medicine. they take medicine but are required to go to counseling. this shows even doctors think they need to talk about it even though they are medicated. medication doesn't always work. after taking a certain amount for a while your body grows accustom to the amount and you have to keep upping the dose. this can't be good for your body. though sometimes talking can be hard for an individual, so all they can do is take medicine.

    ReplyDelete
  3. your video can't be viewed because it is a privet video!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that is the message.

      Delete
  4. Karol saleh
    Section 8
    Which is more effective for most people with emotional issues, talk or medication? What's the best "medicine" for sadness, in your experience?

    The best way to help a person who is sad or depressed is by talking to them and help them out with their problem. From my experience, talking to that person is very effective and helps them have a positive thinking.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Justin fox#12
    Do you think Nietzsche's ideas that the powerful should naturally rise to the top and that all lives aren't equally valuable can be applied to the society we live in?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Justin, Kali and Trent #12
    4) There are many more approaches to mental health than just medication and talk therapy. Medication is often harmful and comes with unwelcome side effects. Talk therapy can be harmful as well depending on the person administering it. Doing enjoyable is one of the best "medicines."
    1) God is not dead, people are just redefining good and evil. They are moving away from organized religion. They are no longer just sheep.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Katelin, Vanessa, and I (Haley) from section 12 talked about how different people require different types of treatment for their sadness. For example, medicine may work for one of us best but for another person, physical activity or talk therapy would be best. We also talked about how it does matter where values come from to an extent, just to have historical background, but it doesn't change the sentiment.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Janet Peoples (8)
    Does it matter where values came from, if they are good values? Why do you think people behave with kindness, compassion, and consideration?

    It shouldn't matter where values came from when they are good because it shows that you are a good person. People behave in different ways from how they grew up and the people they are friends with.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Janet Peoples (8)
    Which is more effective for most people with emotional issues, talk or medication? What's the best "medicine" for sadness, in your experience?

    People do talk about their feelings but most will turn to medication to see if that will help with their depression. In my experience when i was in therapy, they wanted to put me on medication to make me feel better. So more people will take medication because that's what someone else thinks will help them. I think talking about why your sad and being around people you love helps get through hard times.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Janet peoples and karol saleh
    Section 8
    Our thoughts on the feelings talking out your feelings or taking medication, we think talking out your problems is a better way because you can solve the problem.
    It shouldn't matter where good values came from because you are showing you're a good person.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Lucas, Alexis, and Jeri

    During our small group talk we talked about DQ 4. We thought that there would not be a general answer to this question. Each person reacts to their emotions a different way. Some people just need to be talked to and allowed to vent their frustrations, while others may need serious medical help.

    ReplyDelete
  12. (8) our group discussed the "pill for every ill" occurring in the mental health industry. Each of us agreed that even if a medication may be a helpful tool when for someone who has lost control of reality, but this should be a temporary solution. Much like a crutch, the more it is used the more it can hinder recovery.
    We also discussed the movement away from religiousness and into spirituality. Although there was some disagreement at the beginning as to the relationship of religion to spirituality, we all eventually agreed that religion is part of spirituality, but spirituality is not necessarily a part of religion. We agreed to consider religion to be a structural system including traditions and cultural where spirituality can span multiple religions and even be without religion entirely. In that sense, yes we all felt that this movement is occurring. People are finding less comfort in the ancient traditions and more comfort in modern individual spirituality. We theorized that this phenomena has several foundations, including the growth of inter-religious congregations (non-denominational churches), the globalization of cultures (including the internet and the new way in which ideas are shared.)

    ReplyDelete
  13. Section 6

    Suggested DQ:
    Can universal morals and values for humanity be explained logically? If so, how?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Section 6

    DQ #4:
    Venting out emotions or thoughts or even just conversing with somebody can be an extremely power healing tool. Releasing emotions and thoughts can relieve a ton of energy that would've have been wasted putting a veil over your worries. Sometimes if I'm having a rough day and someone talks to me about literally anything, I can immediately feel better. I understand the process behind medication but I have seen the prolonged effects of it. It can eventually start messing with your head, and its ultimately healthier and more powerful to be able to overcome on your own terms.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Section 4 Danielle Bonner
    Quiz questions
    1) What is an Oedipus complex?
    2) A dream involving a sword, snake, umbrella, cave, or purse is what kind of dream (according to Freud)?
    3) What group of people often used Neitzche's work, and not for the better?

    ReplyDelete
  16. Section 4 Danielle Bonner
    Quiz questions
    1) What is an Oedipus complex?
    2) A dream involving a sword, snake, umbrella, cave, or purse is what kind of dream (according to Freud)?
    3) What group of people often used Neitzche's work, and not for the better?

    ReplyDelete
  17. Lucas Futrell (6)
    Quiz Questions:

    1) What is the name of all men's unconscious wish to kill their fathers and have sex with their mothers?
    2) How did Freud refer to dreams?
    3) Who turned Nietzsche's work into Nazi propaganda?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stephen Martin (4)

      1. An Oedipus Complex
      2. The royal road to the unconscious
      3. Friedrich's sister - Elizabeth Nietzsche

      Delete
  18. Lucas Futrell (6)
    Quiz Questions:

    1) What is the name of all men's unconscious wish to kill their fathers and have sex with their mothers?
    2) How did Freud refer to dreams?
    3) Who turned Nietzsche's work into Nazi propaganda?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sect 6
      1. Oedipus Complex
      2. The Royal Road to the Unconscious
      3. His sister Elisabeth

      Delete
  19. Kaitlyn Flint (4)

    1) What was Sigmund Freud often accused of?
    2) What did Freud consider to be the fundamental of happiness?
    3) Schopenhauer was considered to be a nihilist. What does this mean?

    ReplyDelete
  20. Frank Dremel (section 6)
    4. Which is more effective for most people with emotional issues, talk or medication? What's the best "medicine" for sadness, in your experience?
    I think there are many reasons for emotional issues, so this isn’t a cut and dried topic. Some people have imbalances in naturally occurring hormones such as serotonin. Without the proper amount of serotonin, for example, people can become depressed, fatigues, angry, or similarly affected. However, some people do need to talk through emotional issues, whether with a professional or with family or friends. Each person’s needs are individual, and often they need more than one answer. Sometimes they need a combination of therapies. The best “medicine” for most “normal” garden variety sadness is perhaps laughter. Laughter does a couple of things, including producing serotonin and endorphins in the body, so it is not only “spiritually” uplifting, it also can physically or scientifically produce positive results.

    6. Can the forces of reason and irrationality be effectively balanced? Do you attempt such a balance in your own life and personality? Explain.
    I believe the forces of reason and irrationality can not only effectively be balanced, but I believe they should be. There is need for both in one’s life. Reason helps us to understand what can be understood. Reason helps us to bring order and helps us help others to comprehend life and circumstances. But sometimes reason leaves us with a “mess” --- that is to say, there are things which defy our logic at various points of our life, especially as our logic is under constant morphing by the events of our life. In those times, it is almost comforting and even necessary to clear up messy confusion by embracing irrationality. Irrationality allows us a way of coping with things we don’t want or even need to confront at that exact time.
    I do try to balance irrationality and reason. For most things, I use logic and reason to understand and make my choices and comprehend my circumstances. Generally, reason guides me well. Sometimes however, it is nice to sit back and relax in irrationality, thinking out of the box, acting spontaneously and with at least some disregard for “reason”. Sometimes I don’t need to understand or apply rationality to my actions.

    DQ: Does a person who identifies as “spiritual but not religious” miss some parts of a complete spiritual life or does their approach to spirituality address more than a merely religious approach?

    ReplyDelete
  21. Amy Young (4)

    2. Does it matter where values came from, if they are good values? Why do you think people behave with kindness, compassion, and consideration?

    It doesn't matter where values come from. I think people behave that way because society says that is the right thing to do.

    QQ: What did Freud do in psychology?
    QQ: why did Nietzsche say values came from Ancient Greece?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Sterling Smith (#6)10:17 AM CDT

    Quiz Question: Did Freud rely heavily on dreams?

    ReplyDelete
  23. Sterling Smith (#6)10:18 AM CDT

    DQ: Do you think we can learn a lot from our dreams?

    ReplyDelete
  24. Section 4: J. Skylar Dean
    Bonus Questions: 1. Nietzche was appointed as a professor at the university of Basel at the age of ______.
    2. Freud began his career as a ______________.
    3. Freud's idea that all boys want to kill their fathers and sleep with their mothers is called the ___________ complex.
    4. Freud would say if you have a dream that includes a snake, a sword, or an umbrella, they are classic symbols for the ____________.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Section 4, Akmal Ishmetov
      Answers for bonus questions
      1) 24
      2)Neurologist '
      3)Oedipus
      4)Penis

      Delete
  25. Sterling Smith (#6)10:21 AM CDT

    Quiz Question: How old was Nietzsche when he became a professor?

    ReplyDelete
  26. sect 6
    Quiz Questions
    1. (T/F) All unconscious dreams are sexual and violent.
    2.The ________ _________ allowing ideas to flow made the unconscious to become conscious.
    3.What was the idea that our planet was not the heart of the solar system called?
    4.(T/F) Nietzsche always emphasized how emotions and irrational forces shape human values.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Sean Byars Section 6
    QQ: What did Freud think about dreams?

    ReplyDelete
  28. Sean Byars Section 6
    DQ 5: The unconscious mind is definitely real. The idea that our mind represses painful thoughts only makes sense as a defense mechanism; however, studying the subconscious mind is a daunting task as it can be difficult to study conventionally.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Sean Byars Section 6
    DQ 5: The unconscious mind is definitely real. The idea that our mind represses painful thoughts only makes sense as a defense mechanism; however, studying the subconscious mind is a daunting task as it can be difficult to study conventionally.

    ReplyDelete
  30. 6 Brock Francis
    2. Does it matter where values came from, if they are good values? Why do you think people behave with kindness, compassion, and consideration?

    It matters where values come from because that determines the nature of the value. When viewing the given values in the question, people behave in this nature because they have picked the values up from somewhere else. This is why it matters where the values come from. If a given source had provided hatred, the individual would have hatred as a value.

    ReplyDelete
  31. 6 Brock Francis
    5. Is the "unconscious" real? Can it be studied scientifically?

    I believe the "unconscious" is real because it is something that can be experienced by an individual. However, it is difficult to be studied scientifically. The only way to do so would be to study "unconsciousness" is from an external point of view.

    ReplyDelete
  32. 6. The best medicine for sadness is music in my life because the joy that music brings to my life outways all the problems that I have in the day to day.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Stephen Martin (4)

    DQ:
    What is Freud's explanation for where one's belief in God comes from?

    ReplyDelete