Up@dawn 2.0

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Arthur Schopenhauer- sierra cox #11 extra credit 3rd post


                                  Arthur Schopenhauer



Arthur Schopenhauer had ideas about space and time that seemed to be much different than the average person. Schopenhauer thought that space and time were foreign to us and we didn’t recognize this because it was so normal and common in our day to day lives. As in an earlier post I discussed Schopenhauer’s theory of will, well this theory plays a big roll on his description on time and space, as well as in all living things. Schopenhauer often described the will as an undivided unity rather than an individuated being. Like most philosophers, critiques came at him with a multitude of questions about his theory but, Schopenhauer came out on top with answers that quieted most of the naysayers. Schopenhauer gave a reply that stated that the will was simply sorted into a ‘hierarchy of beings’ or pyramid example. The lowest level was will in natural forces and at the highest was human beings, however the middle was left for other beings such as animals and plants. Even though the middle or lower levels of this hierarchy seemed to be less than humans they were still believed to be in the same place as far as time and space goes. Schopenhauer often thought we all contained a certain degree of intelligence regardless of our placement along the hierarchy. He believed that intellect was designed to serve the will as well as serve individual organisms by regulating their relations with the external world in order to secure their self-preservation. Schopenhauer believed everything had a place in this world and we all played a role along space and time.
CoPhilosophy: Sierra Cox #11 first installment Arthur Schopenhauer
http://www.iep.utm.edu/schopenh/

1 comment:

  1. "Schopenhauer came out on top with answers that quieted most of the naysayers."

    I'm not so sure. But it's an interesting inversion, to call S's critics the "naysayers" - we tend to think of HIM as the ultimate naysayer, for whom Will subverts all "merely" personal human aspiration. If "everything had a place in this world and we all played a role along space and time," why (I'd ask S) the long face and deep pessimism?

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