Up@dawn 2.0

Monday, April 21, 2014

Philosoraptors!

Good afternoon! hope everyone is enjoying this great day! Today we got to see a few presentations. Good job to those who presented! After the presentations we went outside to do the daily quiz on the front steps as usual. We went over things from the beliefs of Hugh Hefner to the ideas of Sartre. Very interesting lesson I thought. Looking forward to the final few days of class and hopefully we will have a bigger group turn out! Good luck on y'all's readings and do not forget to post!

and sense there was a presentation about Charles Darwin...

14 comments:

  1. I love the picture. Funny!

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  2. Zachary VanDusen8:41 PM CDT

    So the presentations today were actually really good. You can tell that all three of our peers did their research and were very credible.

    DQ: Do you think that Epicurus was crazy because of his questions about God?

    DQ: Would you consider Darwin a philosopher?

    ** I personally do not look at Darwin as a philosopher. When there was a chapter about him in LH, they stated that he wasn't but his findings influenced the religious beliefs about philosophers of that era and on. I feel that that is an accurate description because Darwin is known for his book "Origin of Species" and his theory of evolution by natural selection, not his personal philosophy (which I haven't researched)

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    2. Yes everyone did do great on their presentations.
      As for your DQ. No, I do not think that Epicurus was crazy. He was just a Philosopher who wanted to see the world happy. He accepted all walks of people in his Garden and that to me says a lot about a man and crazy is not it. His point about death made sense. Why spend all your time worrying about death because when you dead you are dead. People are wasting precious time they could be spending being happy when they are worried about death. Enjoy each moment you have hear on this earth for tomorrow is not promise. Enjoy all the sunshine while you can.

      On Darwin I think he might have been more of a scientist than a philosopher.

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  3. FQ: Where did Hanna Arendt emigrate to as a German Jew? U. S. (LH p210)

    FQ: What did Hitchens describe his social life? "Perfectly Congruent" (AP p293)

    FQ: Why did Smith say Wittgenstein thought philosophy was in trouble when language went on holiday? When language is being used in a philosophically prescribed way instead of a normal way. (PB p207)

    DQ from presentation: Do you agree with Marcus Garvey about African-Americans or Blacks should go back to Africa?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoJDHPm9aw8

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    1. I sort of have the same reaction any time something like this comes up. I think it would be best if people were treated well and could live a good life wherever they wanted to be. I always think its strange when one person tries to say any whole generalized group should do anything - it almost never applies to each person. I agree that he probably had the best of intentions, but he never changed his mind and resorted to talking to evil people instead of listening to the group he was trying to help.

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    2. I always get offended when I'm called African/America. My ancestors were all different nationalities so I considered myself Black point blank. Plus people should check their history. The majority of all race did not start here in America. There are plenty of white people from Africa, mainly South Africa. A person is from where they are from, not where their ancestors are from. All African-America/Blacks can't trace their history back to Africa, so trying to send them all back to a place they no nothing about is useless.

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  4. Nice graphic, Colton. It shows why we say majoring or minoring in philosophy is great prep for just about any career you'd care to pursue.

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  5. FQ: In The Human Condition, Hanna Arendt said that modernity is characterized by "the loss of the world". What did she mean by this? In other words, define Arendt's meaning for "the loss of the world." (The restriction or elimination of traditional standards and values).

    DQ: Let's say for the sake of argument that the Bible is false. Would pursing Christianity be truly less meaningful for the people whose lives where changed for the better?

    LINK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMjo5f9eiX8

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    1. It's Sam! Welcome back!

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    2. I can't say I really believe much of the Bible is true (in that every part of each story happened exactly how they are described), but I would say reading the stories for their morality is meaningful. In that regard I would agree with William James. If religion benefits you than it is meaningful regardless of whether it is exactly true as described or not.

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    3. Hi Stranger...
      Even if the Bible is false I believe if it helps people to do right over wrong then no Christianity wouldn't really be meaningless. It helped that person some kind of wait; therefore, living that life was not in vain for that person's personal experience.

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  6. FQ: Who was obedient to moral orders and tried to use Kant's theory of moral duty as his defense against atrocious acts? (Eichmann)
    DQ: Do you think Eichmann started out thinking he was "only following orders" or was that a way for him to cope with being a monster?
    link: http://psychcentral.com/lib/15-common-defense-mechanisms/0001251
    denial is a defense mechanism

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