Up@dawn 2.0

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

The Obscenely Long-Winded Philosoraptors

Greetings, everyone!

Today was our presentation, and our presentation alone, seeing as nobody else got to say anything since we hogged the entire time.

But other than that, I think we did a good job, guys! For the most part, our presentation was coherent, well thought out, insightful, and barring the poop joke (my bad), professional.

I don't really know what else to put in this, other than to state that I'm so happy that we finally got that over with. Now we can relax a little bit over the weekend this weekend.

I also can't think of anything funny to put in here, but I do have an interesting video from a TED talk (man, those things are awesome) that is relevant to our presentation, "What Superheroes are Made of."

Very interesting video, and well worth the watch if I do say so myself.


And with that, I hope you guys all have a fantastic fall break, and I'll see you all next Wednesday!

9 comments:

  1. I know what you mean. We present our project tomorrow, and then we can relax.

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  2. Anonymous11:31 AM CDT

    Michael Anderson H3
    I agree, I'll be glad when our presentation is finished.

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  3. I'm so glad to hear that it went well! I really wish I could have been there, but I'm looking forward to hearing about this poop joke... see you all on wednesday! (man that feels like forever away)

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  4. The presentation was entertaining and I think we definitely kept Dr. Phil interested. Whether the interest was good or bad the world may never know. Everyone have a great break!



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  5. I thought the guys did a wonderful job with the presentation and looked great!! Good job you guys!

    Factual Question (LH) Who came up with the argument of "the wager"?
    Pascal

    Discussion Question (LH)- One of the most famous quotes in philosophy is "I think, therefore I am" by Descartes. Do you find this statement to be true? Just because you think something, does that means that is exists?
    I would have to agree and disagree. I think of things all the time that I know do not exist. Most of the time its my imagination running wild or me wishing of something that I want. I know they do not exist but they bring me great pleasure in thinking that they do. Many people believe in God but no one really knows until after they die. It's hard to believe that something or someone exists if you never actually seen it.

    Here is a link from the Huffington Post on Descartes famous quote
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mequilibrium/stress_b_2581428.html

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  6. I am very glad that the presentation is over!

    ...Even though I am a little worried about Dr. Oliver's reaction to the material I presented hurting my grade... but I digress...

    I really liked the readings for today, especially the passage about Pascal. I have pretty much been obsessed with him ever since Group Two showed us that amazing video. If you ever get a chance to read the Pensees, DO IT!!!

    Anyway, back to the readings:

    FQ (PB): "...what triggered [the] radical change in [Michel de Montaigne's] career?
    Answer: "...he reached the point in his life where he wanted to retire from active duty and reflect on his experience."

    DQ (PB): Do you agree with the reasoning behind Descartes' "U-shaped" progression from skepticism to "the Cogito" to belief in God to the assurance of the, albeit imperfectly perceived, existing world?

    Here's a link to the essays of Michel de Montaigne: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3600/3600-h/3600-h.htm

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  7. Love your guys' group name hahaha.

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  8. hey its okay I could have talked longer on the whole tin man cyborg subject. that's just the way it goes about your passion, not enough time.

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  9. FQ: What is Descartes's best known contribution to mathematics?
    The Cartesian coordinates, or Cartesian plane. (LH pg. 63)

    DQ: While Pascal's Wager was only applied to the Christian god, conservative estimates for the number of deities throughout human history (extrapolating from an estimated number of religions throughout human history = 63,000) when accounting for monotheistic and polytheistic religions, is around 28,000,000. Applying Pascal's wager to these figures, yields a result of 0.000036% chance that you will select the "correct" god.
    Does this change the outcome of Pascal's wager? Or does even that infinitesimal chance of "betting" correctly make it worth the payoff?

    I hope everyone enjoyed our presentation. If you have any follow-up questions that you didn't get to ask, please post them here.


    Here is something that attempts to answer the question: "Who would win in a fight? Batman or Superman?"

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