Up@dawn 2.0

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Section 16 - Group 1

This past class period, our group never really got a chance to discuss anything philosophical because of the lack of time and the mass confusion of this whole "baseball" score card... (Honestly, still confused about it...) Anyways, we were supposed to read the introduction from Philosophy Bites Back and answer the questions "What's your definition of philosophy? Do you have a favorite philosopher? Can you summarize your current, personal philosophy of life?"

On a personal note, I could answer these questions as my definition of philosophy is pretty basic and agreeable to the generic definition of philosophy which is "love of wisdom". When it comes to my favorite philosopher, currently I do not have one... And if I could summarize my current, personal philosophy of life, it would have to lean towards pacifism. I'm not a complete pacifist, but I do believe that conflict isn't needed in life, and I like a lot of things that pacifism stands for. (Again, this an extremely short summary of what I personally believe... I could explain it better in class next time!)

The rest of my group members are free to comment and answer these questions as well, since we never got a chance to discuss them in class!

28 comments:

  1. unique-section16/group31:12 PM CDT

    i do very much agree with you that violence and conflict is not needed, most of the time. However sometimes it can be the cause of change for the greater good. that is not to say that i condone violence what so ever, but sometimes i partially understand.

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  2. Jake Bogasky5:26 PM CDT

    The baseball scorecard thing was confusing at first, especially since I have never had an interest in baseball, but I think I've got it. I'll agree with pacifism to a point. In modern society have no legitimate need for violence, but from an evolutionary standpoint (i.e., without government), it was needed for several reasons. But then again it may still be needed to deal with individuals you won't obey a higher institution, which is the purpose that law enforcement officials serve. Anyhow, onto the prerequisites for next class. I read PB.

    FQ- What was the name of Plato's play attempting to explain erotic love?
    DQ- Why is it that we, as human beings, feel the need to love?

    And here is Prof. James Giles from the University of Cambridge attempting to explain love- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7LdWsGjpDg

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    1. Anonymous6:15 PM CDT

      We feel the need to love to be attached to someone.

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  3. Kristin (16-3)8:13 PM CDT

    I feel the same as the rest of you about pacifism, I think. While there are some situations where I can see the benefit of using violence, we've simply gotten to a stage in our society where we need to stop seeing each other as the enemy, and realize we're all a single civilization that needs to learn to work together now.

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  4. Ricky (16-3)6:09 PM CDT

    To be honest, a lot of things are confusing to me but bearing it for the time being. I've never really thought about Pacifism as a philosophy, not for myself at least. But after thinking about it I completely agree with your mindset that conflict isn't necessary.

    FQ-Why was Socrates labeled as a 'founder' of Western Philosophy?
    DQ-Should Plato be given all the credit for Socrates' works?

    Here's a youtube video on some background information about Socrates http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2wM4pApOtM

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  5. The generic definition of philosophy "love of wisdom" is missing one thing... passing along that wisdom. My definition of philosophy is to love wisdom and pass it on. If that wisdom never gets shared, then what is the point of gaining all that wisdom and knowledge. I loved the fact that Socrates would go to the common market and just start discussions with random people. Luckily, Plato wrote many of Socrates works down, or these powerful discussions may have been lost.

    FQ- Aristotle learned from Plato. And Plato learned from Socrates. Where did Socrates gain all his knowledge? Who did he look up to?
    DQ- Socrates was a critic of democracy. If not democracy, what type of government did one of the greatest minds of all time believe in?

    Here is a video explaining Socrates' theory of democracy ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WU-TjUZrYQk

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  6. In reply to Jake's discussion question: The Christian take on why human beings feel the need to be loved all stems down to the fact that we love because He first loved us. Love is not really an emotion, it's a commandment that we feel deep inside the most basic parts of ourselves. Even when one does not believe in God, one believes in love. So much of what humans create comes from or through love. Bad or good. We can't avoid it. Love is in our face (well, a version of love) all the time in the entertainment that we distract ourselves with, in our personal lives--whether we lack it or live in the overflow of it, and love is especially on our thoughts. Even for those who profess no need of it, or have been so hurt by it that they don't "believe" in it anymore. As humans we can't live without it. And quite honestly we weren't supposed to.
    Section 17-3

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  7. I have to say that the confusion about rounding the bases/scorecards was pretty comical, though understandable. I also agree that violence is too often the solution we turn to in order to settle our problems.

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  8. Jordan Cornelius11:07 AM CDT

    I also was a bit confused on the baseball game but i'm sure as time goes, we will all get it figured out. And I also agree with a pacifistic philosophy. This would be a great discussion topic for our group.
    FQ: What did Aristotle do that was so significant that multiple people in chapter 1 claimed him to be their favorite?
    DQ: Who could we consider a "philosopher" in our America today?
    And if I had a favorite philosopher I wouldn't exactly know what to say, but I do like the motto "Yolo" by Drake. I'm not religious in any way but here is a link from an Australian Christian about her take on "yolo". http://au.christiantoday.com/article/the-philosophy-of-yolo/15112.htm
    Jordan Cornelius, Section 16, Group 1

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  9. Ben Nguyen (16-1)11:27 AM CDT

    I really like philosophy being defined as "love of wisdom". However, philosophers and their many different philosophies have become so well known that I believe philosophy has also become a pursuit for wisdom.

    I don't really have a favorite philosopher right now, but recently I have been very interested in the work of Immanuel Kant. I agree with how he summarizes ethics, and he kind of shows how human ethics have yet to change throughout the years, since he worked in the 1700s. Basically, he says that the world will never be right as long as we are not consistent in ourselves as a population. What this means is that we can never have utopia until every single person on the planet ACTS like an utopian. He also talks about how in order to do this we must only make decisions that can affect ourselves, and cannot make ethical choices for everyone else. (I'm pretty sure that's how I understood it.)

    FQ - Who was the first "father of philosophy?"

    DQ - Will we ever as a planet figure out a way to live in harmony?

    Here's a quick summary of the work of Immanuel Kant:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwOCmJevigw

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  10. Shannon Allen (H3)5:39 PM CDT

    I am not in this class, but I find the author's personal philosophy of "almost pacifism" interesting. I have a hard time understanding my own personal philosophy, but I think you have put it into wonderful words that I agree with. Nicely put.

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  11. Anonymous9:26 PM CDT

    Abigail Jones (16,3)

    I agree with you that conflict isn't needed in life. It is so hard to imagine life without conflict. I have never understood those people who cause conflict for no reason...what good ever comes out of that?!

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  12. Anthony 17-311:25 AM CDT

    I'm assuming here that by saying "conflict isn't needed in life" you mean violent conflict? Or are you proposing that any disagreement whatsoever would be against your personal philosophy?

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    1. Well the definition of pacifism is "the belief that any violence, including war, is unjustifiable under circumstances, and that all disputes should be settles by peaceful means." Personally, I do not like to deal with conflict in general - when it comes to violence, I would say that, that would be in the same realm for me.

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  13. Shelby 16-36:04 PM CDT

    I'm a firm believer in figuring out problems in the moment. Too many times today, problems are fought over the internet or through other social medias and not face to face. No, fighting isn't always the answer but sometimes it resolves issues. This is best seen in the old days.

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  14. Anthony Helton9:11 PM CDT

    Anthony Helton 16-3
    I believe that fighting is necessary to a certain extent but, we always could solve our problems through a peaceful resolution or by having a mutual agreement. Having the internet has taken away the necessity of speaking face to face which, makes it very hard to get things done because everybody can see things on a social media site.

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    1. Taylore 16-21:10 AM CDT

      I agree with you in that the internet and technology has taken away the necessity of face to communication. People are more likely to respond to a text or email rather than a face to face discussion.

      Delete
  15. I am not a pacifist but i don't believe in fighting unless it is felt completely necessary.which in most to all cases can be solved in peaceful means.like I don't involve myself in fighting at all (which is really hard to do when you play rugby).it is hard to maintain pacifist characteristics if others around you or against you do not.

    FQ: how did Socrates die?
    DQ: how do we in society judge one as wise? (what qualities or characteristics would make you think someone is wise)

    Heres just something to make you think:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WfGMYdalClU

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  16. Austin Duke9:44 PM CDT

    Austin Duke 16-1
    I find all your comments quite interesting ans well as your opinions on pacifism and conflict. I feel that there is nothing more I can add to that conversation so I would like to mention one of my favorite philosophers, Ayn Rand. She promoted the philosophy of objectivism, which I do not agree with entirely. One of the most interesting parts of this philosophy is the idea that individual achievement should not be sacrificed for the good of others. Rather each should do their best for themselves and not expect others who achieve more to take care of them.

    FQ- Under what circumstances did Socrates die?
    DQ- Why do you agree or disagree with the idea in Plato's The Republic.

    And here's the URL for a Monty Python's Philosophy Football: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ur5fGSBsfq8
    And here's a fun link to Monty Python's Philosophy Football:

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  17. I am not a pacifist but i don't believe in fighting unless it is felt completely necessary.which in most to all cases can be solved in peaceful means.like I don't involve myself in fighting at all (which is really hard to do when you play rugby).it is hard to maintain pacifist characteristics if others around you or against you do not.

    FQ: how did Socrates die?
    DQ: how do we in society judge one as wise? (what qualities or characteristics would make you think someone is wise)

    Heres just something to make you think:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WfGMYdalClU

    ReplyDelete
  18. I am not a pacifist but i don't believe in fighting unless it is felt completely necessary.which in most to all cases can be solved in peaceful means.like I don't involve myself in fighting at all (which is really hard to do when you play rugby).it is hard to maintain pacifist characteristics if others around you or against you do not.

    FQ: how did Socrates die?
    DQ: how do we in society judge one as wise? (what qualities or characteristics would make you think someone is wise)

    Heres just something to make you think:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WfGMYdalClU

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  19. I agree with Unique on pacifism; it is moral, for our current time, to be pacifistic but on rare occasions wars can change things for the greater good.To answer Maiya's DQ:I will try to answer this from a psychological stand point on human personality. At 20-40 yo most humans develop a characteristic that Socrates warned about - love for one particular human being. Love is a condition in which you give and expect to receive the same.It is not until 40-60 yo that a person transforms love into care.Caring is loving without return.Final and most important characteristic is acquired by some people is wisdom. Wisdom comes at an age of 60+yo. Wisdom is a moral uprightness; with wisdom one has a special way of thinking. Wisdom is love and care of mankind.

    FQ: What three substitute forms of immortality does Socrates list?
    (Children,honor and fame, and enduring works).
    DQ: Do you guys agree with Diotima's description of how love shifts from one body, to other bodies, and then to soul?

    Here is a 10 minute video on ideas of Socrates and his importance in philosphy.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvY3VWe4O4k

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  20. Taylore 16,21:05 AM CDT

    My personal definitions of "philosophy" is simply " thoughts of wisdom". While I do not have a favorite philosopher, my personal philosophy is:
    "Never settle, always strive to be a better person than you were yesterday because there is always room for improvement."

    FQ: What conclusion did Tocqueville draw about Americans customs and assumption? [AP p.5]
    DQ: Do you believe that the United States is the greatest center of philosophy in the world?

    Short clip about John Dewey Philosopher of Education
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMh1LYuZ3B4

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  21. I agree with you completely on your views! Especially when it comes to pacifism.

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  22. Andrew 16-110:54 AM CDT

    The scorecard was a bit confusing but i look forward to digging deeper into our three books and really begin to understand the importance of philosophy

    FQ-In October of 2011 a conference was help on Bernard Williams, a philosophical giant, but a reality TV show stole the thunder. What was the name of the reality TV show? (AP-pg 4)

    DQ-Do you see the United States as a philosophical country or a mockery of philosophy?

    A philosophical cartoon some may recognize.
    http://philosophycartoons.wordpress.com/

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    1. Chelsea 16-112:07 PM CDT

      I like the scorecard now that I understand it. I read primarily LH for this class.

      FQ: Which philosopher did not think that writing his thoughts down was important?

      DQ: Do you think that Socrates is the most important philosopher know? Why or why not?

      Link to a short history on Socrates http://socrates.clarke.edu/aplg0260.htm

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  23. It was funny we couldn't discuss anything in our groups. But at least we don't have to just sit there and listen to a teacher, Right/

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  24. I currently do not have a favorite philosopher. I also am not sure of what my philosophy of life would be. In our last class session we did not get a chance do go into much of a discussion.
    I read the beginning of America the philisophical. From what I gathered, it seems that the book is going to be about why America is the most philisophical society. It is going to require us to look at America in the new millenium in a way that remains unappreciated by the public.
    FQ: Who is Alexis de Tocqueville?
    DQ: Do you think America is the most philisophical society?
    Here is a link about Tocqueville. He thought America was the most unphilisophical country.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexis_de_Tocqueville

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